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POPE JOHN PAUL II DIES AT 84


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After 26-year reign, pontiff dies at 84

Roman Catholics all over the world gather to mourn

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/04/02...dies/index.html

 

See also this Main Page:

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2005/pope/index.html

 

Saturday, April 2, 2005 Posted: 4:52 PM EST (2152 GMT)

 

 

 

(CNN) -- John Paul II, whose 26-year reign as the charismatic leader of the world's 1 billion Roman Catholics was highlighted by visits to 129 countries, died Saturday. He was 84.

 

"The Holy Father is deceased this evening at 9:37 in his private apartment," Archbishop Leonardo Sandri said in a written statement.

 

"Our beloved Holy Father John Paul II has returned to his home. Let us pray for him."

 

Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls also referred to changes in the papal transition process that were made nine years ago.

 

"All the procedures that were foreseen in the apostolic constitution [universi dominici gregis] that were put forth by John Paul II on the 22 February 1996 have been launched." (Rituals ahead)

 

Sandri asked the throng of thousands of faithful who had congregated in St. Peter's Square for a few moments of silence as he announced the death. People in the crowd bowed their heads to pray, some of them in tears.

 

They then burst into applause.

 

"Let perpetual light shine on him and let him repose in peace," he said.

 

A Mass in the pope's honor will be held at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, he said.

 

The pope was known for his energy, intellectualism and activism on the global stage. His health had been deteriorating severely for several weeks, and he had battled Parkinson's disease and crippling arthritis for years.

 

John Paul had been slipping in and out of consciousness Saturday after his heart and kidneys started to fail after a urinary tract infection.

 

Navarro-Valls said that despite his precarious health, the pope had decided to remain in his residence at the Vatican, rather than returning to Gemelli hospital in Rome, where he had been hospitalized twice since February.

 

He was administered the sacrament of anointing the sick, formerly known as last rites or extreme unction, Thursday night.

 

Pilgrims, tourists and Italians filled St. Peter's Square on Saturday, hours after tens of thousands of people packed the vast space in a nighttime vigil.

 

Thousands of people gathered in Krakow, Poland -- where John Paul served as archbishop before becoming pope -- at the archbishop's residence. People in the crowd prayed for their fellow Pole.

 

In the United States, President Bush said his country loved the pontiff.

 

"All popes belong to the world but Americans had special reason to love the man from Krakow," Bush said at the White House. "Pope John Paul II was himself an inspiration to millions of Americans and to so many more throughout the world.

 

"We will always remember the humble, wise and fearless priest who became one of history's great moral leaders."

 

U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said he was privileged to have met the pope.

 

"Quite apart from his role as a spiritual guide to more than a billion men, women and children, he was a tireless advocate of peace, a true pioneer in interfaith dialogue and a strong force for critical self-evaluation by the Church itself," Annan said.

Lengthy reign as pope

 

Rising from humble beginnings in pre-World War II Poland, John Paul was the most widely traveled pope in history and was the first to visit the White House, a synagogue and communist Cuba.

 

Only two of his 263 predecessors served longer than he did -- St. Peter, the first pope, and Pius IX in the 19th century.

 

Supporters and critics alike agree on the immense significance of his papacy.

 

He played a key role in the fall of communism and brought the Catholic message in person to an unprecedented number of people.

 

He drew enormous crowds in his public appearances and was known for his courage and integrity.

 

A profoundly conservative leader, he reaffirmed many of the church's stances on issues such as abortion, homosexuality and the role of women in the church.

 

Despite criticism, he remained unwavering on those and other stances, including his preference for centralized authority within the church, which some saw as hindering a move toward a more democratic church.

Chronic illnesses

 

The pope suffered from severe hip and knee ailments and Parkinson's disease, a progressive neurological disorder that can make breathing and swallowing difficult.

 

On February 24, doctors performed a tracheotomy to help him breathe, as he struggled to recover from a bout of flu that hospitalized him.

 

Unable to speak, he used hand gestures to bless thousands of people who gathered for a glimpse of him.

 

On Easter, the pope also tried to speak to the crowds but could not get out the words. Ill health forced him to miss several events during Holy Week preceding Easter.

 

On Wednesday, a feeding tube was put down his nose into his stomach to provide additional nutrition.

 

The feeding tube was inserted shortly after the pope's regular weekly audience, where he appeared at the window of his study overlooking St. Peter's Square for about four minutes.

Papal legacy

 

John Paul was born Karol Jozef Wojtyla on May 18, 1920, in Wadowice, Poland.

 

After his ordination as a priest in November 1946, he rose steadily through the church hierarchy, becoming archbishop of Krakow in 1964.

 

He was elevated to cardinal in a secret consistory in 1968 and formally installed in a Vatican ceremony days later.

 

Despite his reputation as a formidable theologian and fearless defender of Catholic interests, his election as pope October 16, 1978 -- the first-ever Slavic pope and the first non-Italian to occupy the post in 455 years -- came as a surprise.

 

So too did the energy and determination he brought to his papacy, never letting health issues get in the way of his travels.

 

Not even an attempted assassination in 1981 kept him down. A Turk named Mehmet Ali Agca shot him twice. The pope recovered and later met Agca in prison and personally forgave him.

 

He re-established the Vatican's diplomatic relations with Great Britain and the United States, as well as with Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization.

 

He delivered more than 2,000 public addresses and issued countless encyclicals and apostolic letters, making him one of the most active men ever to occupy the papal see. He canonized 482 saints, more than any other pontiff, and created 232 cardinals.

 

His papacy was divided into two distinct halves.

 

"In the first 10 years his great concern was with communism," said Warsaw-based Catholic commentator Jonathon Luxmore. "Since then his focus has been more on the ills of Western society."

 

John Paul's role in the fall of communism was a subtle but crucial one. His visit to Poland in 1979 and his support for the Solidarity movement were key in the chain of events that led to the eventual crumbling of Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski's regime 10 years later.

 

His stand against what he saw as the moral failure of Western capitalism, however, was notably less successful.

 

Although his outspoken views on human rights gained him many admirers, his preaching in such areas as sexual mores, science and the role of women in the church alienated many liberal Catholics.

 

"He was what you might call a revolutionary conservative," said Giovanni Ferro, editor of the Rome-based Catholic magazine Jesus.

 

"In some areas he was very forward-minded. In others, however, he was an extremely traditionalist pope. He maintained all sorts of opposing currents in the church, with the result that his successor will probably be faced with a great crisis of direction."

 

Who that successor will be remains to be decided by the College of Cardinals, which will meet at the Vatican in the coming days to select the next pope.

 

Whoever it is will struggle to make his mark, succeeding as he does one of the longest-serving and most contentious figures in papal history.

 

"One thing is for certain," Luxmore said. "[John Paul II] is going to be a terrifically hard act to follow."

 

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An influential pontiff

John Paul II transformed the papacy but conservative views alienated some

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2005/pope/stor...uary/index.html

 

 

 

(CNN) -- Voicing a strong moral vision, Pope John Paul II forged a legacy as one of the Catholic Church's most influential and controversial leaders. The 264th pontiff traveled more and beatified more people than any pope in history.

 

Supporters and critics alike agree on the immense significance of his 26-year papacy.

 

During that period he played a key role in the fall of communism, brought the Catholic message to an unprecedented number of people around the world, and endeared himself to billions with his warmth, charisma, courage and integrity.

 

As TIME magazine noted when naming him Man of the Year in 1994, he generated an electricity "unmatched by anyone else on earth."

 

At the same time, however, he was a profoundly conservative leader whose moral opinions alienated many, and whose centralizing instincts stifled the move toward a more open, democratic church.

 

 

 

A surprise choice as pope

 

John Paul II was born Karol Jozef Wojtyla on May 18, 1920, at Wadowice, Poland, the third child of a devoutly Catholic retired army officer-turned-tailor.

 

 

 

Pope child

Wojtyla, the son of a devoutly Catholic retired Polish army officer, was a surprise choice as pope.

 

A brilliant student and athlete -- he excelled at skiing, swimming, kayaking and soccer -- his earliest passions were religion, poetry and the theater.

 

Following the German invasion of Poland in 1939 he worked first as a stonecutter, then in a chemical plant, while at the same time studying at an underground seminary in Krakow.

 

In 1941, Wojtyla and some friends started an underground theater, called the Rhapsodic Theater, to present works in Polish in defiance of the Nazis.

 

He was eventually ordained in 1946, assuming priestly duties in 1949 as chaplain to university students at Krakow's St. Florian's Church.

 

For the next 30 years he rose steadily through the church hierarchy. He became the auxiliary bishop of Krakow in 1958 and was appointed archbishop of Krakow in January 1964. He was officially installed as archbishop in March 1964.

 

During this time he made a name for himself both as a formidable theologian -- he taught at the Krakow Seminary and the Catholic University of Lublin -- and as a staunch defender of Catholic interests.

 

"I am not afraid of them," he once commented when asked if he feared Poland's communist authorities. "They are afraid of me."

 

He was elevated to cardinal in a secret consistory on June 26, 1967, and was formally installed in a Vatican ceremony two days later.

 

Despite his prominence and the respect in which he was held by his fellow Catholics, his election as Pope John Paul II on October 16, 1978 -- the first-ever Slavic pope, and the first non-Italian to occupy the post for 455 years -- came as a surprise.

 

"I was afraid to receive this nomination," he told the crowd that had gathered in St. Peter's Square in Rome to acclaim his elevation. "But I did it in the spirit of obedience to our Lord and in the total confidence in his mother, the most holy Madonna."

 

 

 

A hard act to follow

 

John Paul II proved one of the most energetic and hard-working men ever to occupy the papal see, visiting more than 120 countries, delivering more than 2,000 public addresses and issuing a plethora of encyclicals and apostolic letters.

 

His papacy divides into two distinct halves.

 

"In the first 10 years his great concern was with communism," explains Catholic commentator Jonathon Luxmore, who has been based in Warsaw, Poland, since 1988.

 

"Since then his focus has been more on the ills of Western society and on spreading the message that the collapse of communism shouldn't necessarily mean the triumph of liberal capitalism."

 

John Paul's role in the fall of communism was a subtle but crucial one. His visit to Poland in 1979, eight months after his elevation to the papal throne, saw the first mass gatherings ever witnessed in the communist state, sparking a chain of events that led to the eventual crumbling of Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski's regime 10 years later.

 

His stand against what he saw as the moral failure of Western capitalism, on the other hand, was notably less successful.

 

While his outspoken views on human rights gained him many admirers, his preaching in such areas as sexual mores, science and the role of women in the church alienated many young, female and liberal Catholics.

 

Giovanni Ferro agrees: "He was what you might call a revolutionary conservative. In some areas, such as the preparedness to enter into dialogue with other religions, he was very forward-minded.

 

"In other areas, however, he was an extremely reactionary, traditionalist pope. He maintained all sorts of opposing currents in the church, with the result that his successor will probably be faced with a great crisis of direction."

 

In the end it is perhaps too early to provide any definitive judgment on one of the longest and most widely discussed reigns in papal history. Pope John Paul II was the third longest serving pontiff in history, behind St. Peter's 32 years and Pope Pius IX's 31 years, seven months.

 

His humanity, love of children and ceaseless efforts to bring the Catholic message to as wide an audience as possible marked him as one of the dominant and most respected figures of the 20th century and early 21st century.

 

At the same time, he has left a legacy of division and uncertainty within the church that could take his successor many years to resolve.

 

"One thing is for certain," says Luxmore. "He is going to be a terrifically hard act to follow."

 

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The early years: An unhappy childhood

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(CNN) -- Before he became the leader of the Roman Catholic Church, Pope John Paul II was Karol Jozef Wojtyla.

 

Friends in Wadowice, a town of 8,000 Catholics and 2,000 Jews 35 miles southwest of Krakow, called Wojtyla "Lolek." He was born in 1920, the second son of Karol Wojtyla (pronounced voy-TIH-wah) Sr., a retired army officer and tailor, and Emilia Kaczorowska Wojtyla, a schoolteacher of Lithuanian descent.

 

The Wojtylas were strict Catholics but did not share the anti-Semitic views of many Poles. One of the young Wojtyla's playmates was Jerzy Kluger, a Jew who remembers youthful soccer games, Catholics versus Jews.

 

But in the predominantly Catholic town of Wadowice, the Jewish population was small. Kluger said Wojtyla would volunteer to help even the odds on the playing field.

 

"There usually was not enough Jews, so somebody had to play on the Jewish team and he was always sort of ready, you know," Kluger said in a 2003 interview.

 

For the time and place, the friendship between the two men was unusual but they formed a lasting bond. Kluger would later play a key role as a go-between for John Paul II and Israeli officials when the Vatican extended long-overdue diplomatic recognition to Israel.

 

Indeed, Wojtyla became the first pope to visit a synagogue and the first to visit the memorial at Auschwitz to victims of the Holocaust. In ending the Catholic-Jewish estrangement, he called Jews "our elder brothers."

Losing his mother

 

As a schoolboy, Wojtyla was both an excellent student and an athlete who skied, hiked, kayaked and swam in the Skawa River. But death hovered over the family, making itself felt first when an infant sister died before Wojtyla was born.

Parents

Wojtyla lost his mother in 1929 and his father in 1941; neither lived to see him become a priest.

 

It struck again in 1929 when his mother died of heart and kidney problems, just a month before his ninth birthday. And when he was 12, his 26-year-old brother Edmund, a physician in the town of Bielsko, died of scarlet fever.

 

"I would say he lost his childhood at 12, when he lost his brother," said Szczepan Mogielnicki, a childhood friend of Wojtyla, in a 2003 CNN interview. "There was no youthful folly in him. Even when he played sports, he was very concentrated, but of course, he had a lot of passion. He was a very noble person, and he expressed things in a very noble way, but there was no folly."

 

Wojtyla himself had two near misses with mortality in his youth. He was hit once by a streetcar and again by a truck in 1944 while a college student. The injuries left the otherwise robust pope -- 5-foot-10 1/2 inches, 175 pounds in his prime -- with a slight stoop to his shoulders that is particularly noticeable when he is tired.

 

Even as an adult he has been beset by physical difficulties, including a dislocated shoulder, a fractured femur, hip-replacement surgery, the removal of a precancerous tumor from his colon and an attempt on his life by a gunman whose two bullets wounded the pope in the abdomen, right arm and left hand.

 

Wojtyla and his father lived in a spartan, one-room apartment behind the church, and the father devoted himself to raising his son. He sewed his son's clothes and had the boy study in a chilly room to toughen him and develop his concentration.

 

But the father didn't forget about play. A friend remembers entering the Wojtylas' apartment and finding father and son playing soccer with a ball made of rags.

Poetry, religion and theater

 

Wojtyla's passions in those early years were poetry, religion and the theater. After graduating from secondary school in 1938, he and his father moved to Krakow where he enrolled at Jagiellonian University to study literature and philosophy.

Acting

Acting was one of Wojtyla's interests.

 

He founded an underground theater company, writing and acting in plays that frequently dealt with oppression, and participated in poetry readings and literary discussion groups. Friends say he was an intense and gifted actor and a fine singer.

 

"He was really talented," said Danuta Michalowska in a 2003 CNN interview. "He was wise not only in the usual meaning of the word, but also in the artistic sense. He knew what to do with a word. He knew how to say it."

 

After the Germans invaded Poland, he escaped deportation and imprisonment in late 1940 by taking a job as a stonecutter in a quarry.

 

A few months later, in February 1941, Wojtyla's 61-year-old father died, leaving his dream of seeing his son commit to the priesthood unfulfilled. The pope has said that his father once told him, "I will not live long and would like to be certain before I die that you will commit yourself to God's service."

 

It was another 18 months, however, before Wojtyla began studying at an underground seminary in Krakow and registered for theology courses at the university, even though the Nazis were actively killing priests who opposed them.

 

"The rest of us, we were like most intellectuals at the time, practicing Catholics, but our Catholicism was rather superficial," Michalowska said. "There was a distinct difference between him and us."

 

He continued his studies, acted and worked in a chemical plant until August 1944. But when the Germans began rounding up Polish men, Wojtyla took refuge in the archbishop of Krakow's residence and remained there until the end of the war.

 

He was ordained in 1946 in Krakow and spent much of the next few years studying -- he earned a master's degree and doctorates in theology and philosophy -- before taking up priestly duties as an assistant pastor in Krakow in 1949.

 

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The priesthood years: Rebel with a cause

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2005/pope/stor...bio2/index.html

 

 

(CNN) -- In the early years of his priesthood, Karol Wojtyla served as a chaplain to university students at St. Florian's Church in Krakow. The church was conveniently located next to Jagiellonian University, where he was working on his second doctorate degree in theology, having already earned a doctorate in philosophy.

 

When the university's theology department was abolished in 1954, presumably under pressure from the communist government, the entire faculty reconstituted itself at the Seminary of Krakow, and Wojtyla continued his studies there.

 

He was also hired that same year by the Catholic University of Lublin -- the only Catholic university in the communist world -- as a non-tenured professor. The arrangement turned Wojtyla into a commuter, shuttling between Lublin and Krakow on the overnight train to teach and counsel in one city and study in the other.

 

He also founded and ran a service that dealt with marital problems, from family planning and illegitimacy to alcoholism and physical abuse. TIME magazine called it "perhaps the most successful marriage institute in Christianity."

 

In 1956, Wojtyla was appointed to the chair of ethics at Catholic University, and his ascent through the church hierarchy got a boost in 1958 when he was named the auxiliary bishop of Krakow.

 

When the Vatican Council II began the deliberations in 1962 that would revolutionize the church, Wojtyla was one of its intellectual leaders and took special interest in religious freedom. The same year, he was named the acting archbishop of Krakow when the incumbent died.

 

 

A genial and charming companion

 

Wojtyla has been described, by all accounts, as a genial and charming companion, a good listener and not above what TIME calls "good-natured kidding."

 

Margaret Steinfels, the former editor of Commonweal magazine in New York, described him as "a very brilliant man, very intelligent and very holy... extremely amiable and affable, and wonderful to talk and dine with."

 

 

Pope Cardinal

As a cardinal, Wojtyla was considered a moderate reformer.

 

He also was shrewd enough not to let his distaste for communism show. His appointment as cardinal in 1967 by Pope Paul VI was welcomed by the government. Wojtyla was considered "tough but flexible" and a moderate reformer, but an improvement on old-school hard-liners who were unalterably opposed to communism and communists.

 

Wojtyla bided his time, engaging in a strategy that honored Catholic beliefs and traditions while accommodating the communist government.

 

The Catholic Church in Poland served as an important outlet for the expression of national feeling. In his book "John Paul II," George Blazynski wrote that Wojtyla encouraged this expression in a form that did not "provoke a brutal reaction by forces within and perhaps without the country."

 

But he also proved to be what Current Biography called "a resilient enemy of communism and champion of human rights, a powerful preacher and sophisticated intellectual able to defeat Marxists in their own line of dialogue."

 

According to George Weigel, who has written extensively about the pope, Wojtyla demanded permits to build churches, defended youth groups and ordained priests to work underground in Czechoslovakia.

 

Wojtyla was once asked if he feared retribution from government officials.

 

"I'm not afraid of them," he replied. "They are afraid of me."

 

 

 

Learned and scholarly

 

start quoteIt is the task of the Church, of the Holy See, of all pastors, to fight on the side of man, often against man himself.end quote

-- From a 1976 sermon given while still a cardinal and the archbishop of Krakow

 

In spite of all his activities, Wojtyla didn't slight his scholarly duties.

 

He wrote a treatise in 1960 called "Love and Responsibility" that laid out the foundation for what Weigel calls "a modern Catholic sexual ethic."

 

His second doctoral thesis -- "Evaluation of the Possibility of Constructing a Christian Ethic based on the System of Max Scheler" -- was published that same year.

 

In 1969, the Polish Theological Society published Wojtyla's "The Acting Person," a dense philosophical tract on phenomenology that Wojtyla discussed during a U.S. visit in 1978.

 

"All sorts of people turned up," recalls Jude Dougherty, chairman of the philosophy department at Catholic University in Washington, where the talk was held. "It was extremely well-received by people who were familiar with the subject. And those who weren't were awed to hear a cardinal who was very learned and very scholarly."

 

Weigel wrote that in 1976, when Wojtyla was invited to lead spiritual exercises before Pope Paul VI at a Lenten retreat, his first three references were to the Bible, St. Augustine and German philosopher Martin Heidegger.

 

In 1977, Wojtyla gave a talk at a university in Milan called "The Problem of Creating Culture through Human Praxis."

An emotional man

 

Although he had established himself as a formidable intellectual presence -- as well as an able administrator and fund-raiser -- few suspected that the Sacred College of Cardinals would choose Wojtyla as the next pope after the death of John Paul I in September 1978.

Charismatic and sociable, Wojtyla was recognized as a community leader in Krakow.

 

But when the cardinals were unable to agree on a candidate after seven rounds of balloting, Wojtyla was chosen on the eighth round late in the afternoon of October 16.

 

He reportedly formally accepted his election before the cardinals with tears in his eyes. (Associates say the pope was an emotional man, and was often moved to tears by children.)

 

Wojtyla chose the same name as his predecessor -- whose reign lasted just 34 days before he died of a heart attack -- and added another Roman numeral in becoming the first Slavic pope. He was also the first non-Italian pope in 455 years (the last was Adrian VI in 1523) and, at 58, the youngest pope in 132 years.

 

"I was afraid to receive this nomination," he told the crowd from a balcony overlooking St. Peter's Square, "but I did it in the spirit of obedience to Our Lord and in the total confidence in His mother, the most holy Madonna."

 

Weigel said that when Wojtyla's election was announced, Yuri Andropov, leader of the Soviet Union's KGB intelligence agency, warned the Politburo that there could be trouble ahead. He was right.

 

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The papal years: charisma and restoration

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2005/pope/stor...bio3/index.html

 

 

 

(CNN) -- Less than eight months after his inauguration, Wojtyla returned to Poland as Pope John Paul II for nine cathartic days.

 

Huge, adoring crowds met him wherever he went and were an acute source of embarrassment to the communist government. Officially, the country was atheistic; it was also suffering from food shortages. The pope added to the authorities' discomfort by reminding his fellow Poles of their human rights.

 

"That was the beginning of the end of what we call the Soviet Empire," Robert Moynihan, editor and publisher of the magazine "Inside the Vatican," told CNN in a 2003 interview. "I think he brought that empire down, but not with missiles and not even with economic sanctions, but just by being a man, by being a man of faith."

 

In the fall of 1979, the pope flew to Ireland and celebrated a Mass in Dublin's Phoenix Park for 1.2 million people -- more than a quarter of Ireland's population at the time.

 

He continued on to the United States where his visits to Boston, Massachusetts; New York; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Des Moines, Iowa; Chicago, Illinois; and Washington took on the trappings of major holidays.

 

The cities threw open their arms in a welcome that Current Biography said was of "staggering, unprecedented magnitude."

 

"Private citizens, Catholic and non-Catholic alike, flocked by the millions to glimpse the pope," it reported. "It was only a few short years ago that such mass forgetfulness of sectarian difference would have been unthinkable (and, politically, suicidal) in the United States."

 

 

Vibrations in the air

 

There was more to it than forgetfulness, for John Paul displayed that charisma during more than 200 visits to more than 125 countries over the past 26 years. And as TIME noted in naming him Man of the Year in 1994, he generated an electricity "unmatched by anyone else on earth."

 

In his book "The Making of Popes 1978," Andrew M. Greeley offered a close-up of the pope working a crowd: "His moves, his presence, his smile, his friendliness, his gestures ... have pleased everyone. ... He is great with crowds -- shaking hands, smiling, talking, kissing babies."

 

The Los Angeles Times reported that Poles waited for hours to see the pope when he returned in 1997. At his appearance, the crowds grew silent, "some falling to their knees and weeping as John Paul (parted) the crowd on a path to the altar."

 

"Such an incredible moment," Krzysztof Gonet, mayor of Nowej Soli, told the Times. "You can feel the vibrations in the air."

 

Not only was he the most traveled pope in history -- he spoke eight languages, learning Spanish after he became pope -- he also was quick to use the media and technology to his advantage.

 

In the early years of his papacy, he steered the Vatican into satellite transmissions and videocassettes. While other popes stayed close to Rome, remote and seemingly unapproachable, John Paul's wide-ranging appearances -- enhanced by an actor's sense of theater -- became worldwide news events.

 

When the pope visited Cuba in January 1998, hard-line Cuban leader Fidel Castro set aside his drab olive fatigues and put on a business suit to welcome him. Castro also attended a number of functions for the pope and escorted the frail Holy Father with almost touching deference.

Crowds

A man with charisma, crowds gathered wherever Pope John Paul II went.

 

 

The world is his business

 

Not content with tending merely to church affairs, John Paul made the world's business his business -- especially in regard to human rights.

 

"His engagement as pontiff was not only to spread out the gospel, to spread out the faith, but also to transform the Roman papacy into the spokesman of human rights," Marco Politi, author of "His Holiness," told CNN in 2003.

 

His criticism of such dictators as Alfred Stroessner in Paraguay, Augusto Pinochet in Chile and Ferdinand Marcos in the Philippines encouraged opposition movements that eventually brought down those governments.

 

His support for the Solidarity movement in Poland -- priests concealed messages from John Paul to imprisoned union leaders in their robes -- was a key to the downfall of communism in Poland.

 

When a Turk named Mehmet Ali Agca shot the pope twice in an assassination attempt in 1981, Agca first told the authorities that he was acting for the Bulgarian intelligence service. The Bulgarians were known to do the bidding of the KGB, but Agca later recanted that part of his confession.

 

It didn't matter to the pope who was responsible, and later he visited Agca in his cell and forgave him. The astonished Agca said, "How is it that I could not kill you?"

 

But the pope didn't play favorites, and the West received its share of criticism. During that first triumphal visit to the United States, he warned his hosts about the dangers of materialism, selfishness and secularism and suggested lowering the standard of living and sharing the wealth with the Third World.

 

The message didn't play well. But that didn't stop the pope from insisting that materialism -- he regards capitalism and communism as flip sides of the same coin -- was not the answer.

 

"This world," he said, "is not capable of making man happy."

 

However, he believed the pursuit of a right relationship with God was life's paramount pursuit. To that end, he led by example -- through faith and prayer. Indeed, he was so often in prayer that he was said to make his decisions "on his knees."

 

At times, he was found kneeling on the ground in the middle of winter before a statue, and deep in prayer with his head resting on an altar. Even when not interacting with others, he was seen moving his lips, apparently in prayer.

'A culture of death'

 

start quoteA nation that kills its own children has no future.end quote

-- The pope's reaction to the liberalization of the abortion law in Poland in 1996

 

The Catholic Church John Paul II inherited in 1978 was in shambles. Reforms begun by the Vatican Council II shook the church to its foundation, and the tumult within the church could be compared to the turmoil in the outer world during the 1960s era of peace, love and protests over the war in Vietnam.

 

"The church went through a tremendous crisis," says Moynihan. "It knocked the church to its knees. It lost one-third of its priests and a tremendous number of nuns."

 

John Paul II embarked on nothing less than a restoration of the church, one grounded in its conservative tradition. His rejection of contraception and abortion was absolute and unbending, and his almost dictatorial manner did not always play well.

 

"When he came to power and he was elected, he realized that one thing he had to do was to restore clarity to Catholic teaching. And he says, 'OK, maybe they won't obey, maybe they don't accept, but at least they'll know what the church stands for,'" said Wilton Wynn, author of "Keeper Of The Keys," in a 2003 CNN interview.

 

"It's a mistake to apply American democratic procedures to the faith and truth," the pope said. "You cannot take a vote on the truth."

 

Hans Kung, a liberal Catholic theologian who crossed swords with the pope, told TIME, "This pope is a disaster for our church. There's charm there, but he's closed-minded."

 

In his opposition to contraception, abortion and euthanasia, for example, he accused the industrialized world of fostering "a culture of death."

 

The pope also confounded critics with his insistence that church doctrine prohibits the ordination of women. In affirming his position in a letter to bishops in 1994, he wrote in uncompromising fashion that "this judgment is to be definitively held by all the church's faithful."

 

"The pope's conservatism on issues such as contraception or abortion comes, I think, from his view of women and what he thinks their role and their status in society should be," said Mary Segers, a political science professor at Rutgers University, in a CNN interview from 2003. "I think the pope grew up with that. It's reinforced in Poland by a fierce devotion to the Virgin Mary as the patroness of Poland."

 

However, his opposition to the ordination of women priests had its supporters as well.

 

"Catholics believe what the priest is doing is, in a sense, representing the sacrifice of Christ," said Helen Hull Hitchcock of the Catholic group Women For Faith And Family. "He's standing in the person of Christ. He represents Christ in a way. And it makes sense then, that someone who is representing Christ would be male, as Christ was."

'A man of integrity and prayer'

 

The pope often explained himself with dense, closely reasoned and deeply philosophical encyclicals. His encyclicals, letters and other writings fill more than 150 volumes.

 

In 1994, the pope wrote answers to written questions posed to him by Italian journalist Vittorio Messori. Messori then edited them into "Crossing the Threshold of Hope," a book that became a best-seller in many countries.

 

Many observers have said John Paul's record is mixed. Although the church has expanded in Africa and Latin America -- the latter accounts for about half of the estimated 1 billion Catholics -- it has lost followers in the industrialized world, including Poland.

 

His inflexibility on issues with international ramifications -- birth control in Africa, for example -- drew strong criticism.

 

"The church's refusal of condoms even for saving lives is absolutely incomprehensible," French journalist Henri Tincq told TIME. "It disqualifies the church from having any role in the whole debate over AIDS."

 

But many are certain the pope's papacy will be remembered not for its shortfalls but its achievements.

 

"You'd be hard pressed to name any global figure who has achieved 100 percent of the things they set out to achieve," said John Allen, a Vatican analyst for CNN and Rome correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter. "I think the measure of success really has to be sort of fidelity to one's own vision and the capacity to make that vision real."

 

It is doubtful there has ever been a pope who so successfully translated his strength, determination and faith into such widespread respect and goodwill. In a world of shifting trends and leaders of questionable virtue, John Paul II was a towering figure at the moral center of modern life.

 

"This is not a pope who looks at the public opinion polls," said Father Thomas Reese, editor in chief of the Catholic weekly magazine "America" and author of "Inside the Vatican." "He says what he thinks is right and wrong from conviction. And that's why people admire him. He's a man of integrity and prayer, even if they don't agree with him."

 

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John Paul II: A strong moral vision

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(CNN) -- On the last day of a week-long celebration in October 1998 marking his 20 years as pope, John Paul II celebrated an open-air mass for 75,000 people in St. Peter's Square and wondered aloud whether he'd done a good job.

 

"Have you been a diligent and vigilant master of the church?" he asked himself. "Have you tried to satisfy the expectations of the faithful of the church and also the hunger for truth that we feel in the world outside the church?"

 

The pope offered no answers to the questions, but he did ask for prayers to help him carry on "right to the end."

 

In the papal tradition, "right to the end" meant the pope planned to die not as an ailing pensioner in the Apennines, but as the pope. Of the 263 men who preceded John Paul II as pope, only one -- Celestine V in 1294 -- left the papacy before his death.

 

Regardless of how he rated his performance, there is little doubt that John Paul II was regarded as one of the most significant figures of the last 100 years.

 

Indeed, there are those who believe he was nothing less than "the man of the century."

 

One of them is Jonathan Kwitney, whose "Man of the Century: The Life and Times of Pope John Paul II" was published in 1997. Another is George Weigel, a senior fellow at the conservative Ethics and Public Policy Center and author of "Witness to Hope: The Biography of Pope John Paul II."

 

"This has been the most intellectually serious pontificate in several hundred years and it is not going to be easy to find a pope who brings to this office the degree of engagement with ongoing intellectual life and cultural life around the world," Weigel told CNN in an interview before the pontiff's death.

 

 

 

The omnipresent papacy

 

Until John Paul II, most popes confined themselves to Rome and its environs. They were distant, seemingly unapproachable and, if doctrine held, infallible. But John Paul revolutionized the papacy that oversees the spiritual lives of 1 billion Catholics. A conservative and champion of long-standing church traditions, he was also the most-traveled pope in history and very much a man of the world.

 

 

 

Travel

John Paul II created "the seemingly omnipresent papacy," wrote Australian priest Paul Collins.

 

In his book, "Papal Power," Australian priest Paul Collins wrote that by being so widely traveled -- he visited more than 120 countries -- and in his use of television, the pope created "an entirely new situation in church history: the seemingly omnipresent papacy."

 

He was also a key figure at a pivotal juncture in world history. As a cardinal in Poland, he was a shrewd and unflinching opponent of communism, advancing the church's agenda without allowing outright hostility -- and repression -- to develop.

 

As pope, his clandestine support of the Solidarity movement was instrumental and ultimately led to the downfall of the government.

 

"I think he played an extraordinary role in bringing about the end of communism, the end of the cold war, by his support of Solidarity and in encouraging the Polish people to stand up for their rights," Father Thomas Reese, editor of America magazine and author of "Inside the Vatican," told CNN in 2003.

 

The pope brought a strong focus on human rights to his preaching and his travels gave his teachings a global political impact unknown to previous popes. In Poland and Eastern Europe, Africa, the Philippines, Haiti and dozens of other places, the pope's preaching on human rights and individual liberty helped inspire those who fought for political change.

 

"His engagement as pontiff was not only to spread out the gospel, but also to transform the Roman papacy into the spokesman of human rights," said Marco Politi, author of "His Holiness," in a CNN profile of the pontiff broadcast in 2003.

 

John Paul II addressed the value of human rights in his 1987 encyclical, "Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concerns)."

 

"When individuals and communities do not see a rigorous respect for the moral, cultural and spiritual requirements, based on the dignity of the person and on the proper identity of each community, beginning with the family and religious societies, then all the rest -- availability of goods, abundance of technical resources applied to daily life, a certain level of material well-being -- will prove unsatisfying and in the end contemptible," he wrote.

 

In a 1998 letter issued to mark the World Day of Peace, he wrote about issues involved in the global economy: "The challenge, in short, is to ensure a globalization in solidarity, a globalization without marginalization. This is a clear duty in justice, with serious moral implications in the organization of the economic, social, cultural and political life of nations."

 

He also addressed the church's role in past human rights issues. In 1998, the Vatican apologized for Catholics who had failed to help save Jews from Nazi persecution and acknowledged centuries of preaching contempt for Jews.

 

The pope expanded upon that in a March 2000 speech in which he asked forgiveness for many of his church's past sins, including its treatment of Jews, heretics, women and native peoples.

 

It was believed to be the first time in the Catholic Church's history that one of its leaders sought such a sweeping pardon.

 

"He also is going to go down in history as the pope who improved relations with Jews," Reese said. "This is extremely important. Now Jews and Catholics are beginning to treat one another as brothers and sisters again. This is just extraordinarily important."

 

He also opposed both the 1991 Persian Gulf War and the 2003 invasion of Iraq by a U.S.-led coalition.

 

 

 

A critic of the West

 

In 1998, he visited Cuba and in a dramatic speech in front of Cuban President Fidel Castro, the pope criticized Cuba's lack of religious freedom.

 

 

 

But the pope also criticized the U.S. sanctions against Cuba. Indeed, the pope criticized the West with just as much vigor as he once spent on godless communism.

 

The pope was especially harsh with the West because he believed that in its preoccupation with materialism, it was frittering away the chance to know the truth. The cost, he believed, was a slackening in society's moral fiber.

 

For its acquiescence to contraception, abortion and even euthanasia, John Paul accused the West of fostering "a culture of death." In 1994, he used his influence to defeat a U.S.-backed initiative on population control at the U.N.'s International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo.

 

The pope explained himself in his best-selling 1994 book, "Crossing the Threshold of Hope." "We cannot afford forms of permissiveness that would lead directly to the trampling of human rights, and also to the complete destruction of values which are fundamental not only for the lives of individuals and families, but for society itself," he wrote.

 

He also opposed cloning, raising the specter of test-tube babies being used for body parts.

 

In his final book, "Memory and Identity," the pope criticized homosexual marriages as part of "a new ideology of evil" that is insidiously threatening society, and called abortion a "legal extermination."

 

The pontiff referred to "pressures" on the European Parliament to allow gays to marry.

 

"It is legitimate and necessary to ask oneself if this is not perhaps part of a new ideology of evil, perhaps more insidious and hidden, which attempts to pit human rights against the family and against man," he writes.

Finding fault

 

Not everyone agreed with the pope, of course, and at times the "omnipresent papacy" had its downside. John Paul said things he later regretted, but too late to keep them from getting halfway around the world.

 

Buddhist priests in Sri Lanka boycotted his visit there after he was quoted as saying Buddhism was "an atheistic system." He also was criticized for questioning the legitimacy of the Episcopalian priesthood, for appointing "yes men" to the College of Cardinals and for giving a papal knighthood to Kurt Waldheim, the former Austrian president who once worked for German intelligence during World War II.

 

He also was criticized in the sexual abuse scandal in which a number of priests in the United States were accused of -- and some convicted of -- molesting children. In some instances, the church was accused of knowing about problem priests but not informing parishioners.

 

Critics cited the Vatican's slow response to accusations of sexual misconduct, and its tendency to regard such reports as attempts to discredit the church.

 

In March 2002, the pope briefly alluded to the scandal in an annual letter to priests. At the end of the letter, he wrote: "At this time we are personally and profoundly afflicted of the sins of some of our brothers who have betrayed the grace of ordination in succumbing even to the most grievous forms of the mysterium inequitatis (the mystery of evil) at work in the world."

 

A month later, the pope summoned U.S. cardinals to discuss the sex abuse scandal and told them there is no place in priesthood for clerics who abuse children. He also acknowledged mistakes in how the church handled the issue.

 

His support for conservative lay Catholic movements such as Opus Dei and the Legionaries of Christ were distressing to some, who saw them as the Catholic counterpart to the Protestant fundamentalist right.

 

And many questioned his opposition to the ordination of women, which the pope maintained was inconsistent with church doctrine.

 

 

 

Strict discipline for clergy

 

The pope also had major influence on the Vatican's leadership of the church. He imposed strict discipline on his clergy after the more collegial leadership of his predecessors. In his papacy, John Paul II showed little tolerance for those who failed to carry out his orders.

 

start quoteEven as they praise this man as a great pope, they will be secretly relieved and they will want to elect a man who will be a little less heavy-handed.end quote

-- Father Richard McBrie, author of "Lives of the Popes"

 

"In terms of church, theology, religion, he's very, very conservative, and in fact, more and more so as time goes by," said Tad Szulc, author of the biography, "Pope John Paul II," in a 2003 CNN interview. "He does not brook dissent. He is impatient with those who do not follow his line of theological reasoning, who do not obey the church. He's a very severe judge."

 

His uncompromising views forced many Catholics, including priests and bishops, into open disagreement with the pope, especially on issues such as sexuality, celibacy and the role of women in the church.

 

Much to the dismay of some senior clergymen, John Paul consistently refused to accept their arguments for modernizing church teachings.

 

"Even as they praise this man as a great pope, they will be secretly relieved and they will want to elect a man who will be a little less heavy-handed in his exercise of authority and more respectful of their own authority," said Father Richard McBrie, author of "Lives of the Popes," in an interview with CNN before the pontiff's death.

 

The sheer length of John Paul II's papacy also had a major impact on the church. During his long tenure he appointed many of the bishops and most all of the cardinals, a hierarchy picked to reflect his conservative views and one that will choose the next pope.

 

"That is an extremely clear way in which he will impact the future of the church by having an impact on who his successor will be," Reese said in an interview before the pontiff's death.

 

Whether he was the man of the century or the prophet of a spiritual renaissance may be a judgment call. But clearly John Paul II was unafraid to articulate his vision of a better world and had the passion and integrity to hold himself to that vision.

 

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Papal travels

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Pope John Paul II was by far the most well-traveled pontiff. Since becoming pope in 1978, he flew more than 700,000 miles, equivalent to more than 28 times round the world. His trips to more than 120 countries and territories took him away from the Vatican for more than a year-and-a-half. Click on the letters below to see the places he visited.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A

Albania (April 1993)

Angola (June 1992)

Argentina (June 1982, March 1987)

Armenia (2001)

Australia (November 1986, January 1995)

Austria (September 1983, June 1988, June 1998)

Azerbaijan (May 2002)

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B

Bahamas (January 1979)

Bangladesh (November 1986)

Belgium (May 1985, June 1995)

Belize (March 1983)

Benin (February 1982, February 1993)

Bolivia (May 1988)

Bosnia and Herzegovina (April 1997, June 2003)

Botswana (September 1988)

Brazil (June 1980, June 1982, October 1991, October 1997)

Bulgaria (May 2002)

Burkina Faso (May 1980, January 1990)

Burundi (September 1990)

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C

Cameroon (August 1985, September 1995)

Canada (September 1984, September 1987, July 2002)

Cape Verde (January 1990)

Central African Republic (August 1985)

Chad (January 1990)

Chile (March 1987)

Colombia (July 1986)

Congo (May 1980)

Costa Rica (March 1983)

Croatia (September 1994, October 1998, June 2003)

Cuba (January 1998)

Curacao (May 1990)

Czech Republic (April 1990, May 1995, April 1997)

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D

Denmark (June 1989)

Dominican Republic (January 1979, October 1984, October 1992)

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E

East Timor (1989)

Ecuador (January 1985)

Egypt (February 2000)

El Salvador (March 1983, February 1996)

Equatorial Guinea (February 1982)

Estonia (September 1993)

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F

Fiji (November 1986)

Finland (June 1989)

France (May 1980, August 1983, October 1986, October 1988, September 1996, September 1997, August 2004)

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G

Gabon (February 1982)

Gambia (February 1992)

Georgia (November 1999)

Germany (West Germany in November 1980 and April 1987, June 1996)

Ghana (May 1980)

Greece (2001)

Great Britain (May 1982)

Guam (February 1981)

Guatemala (March 1983, February 1996, July 2002)

Guinea (February 1992)

Guinea-Bissau (January 1990)

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H

Haiti (March 1983)

Honduras (March 1983)

Hungary (August 1991, September 1996)

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I

Iceland (June 1989)

India (January 1986, November 1999)

Indonesia (October 1989)

Ireland (September 1979)

Israel (March 2000)

Ivory Coast (May 1980, August 1985, September 1990)

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J

Jamaica (August 1993)

Japan (February 1981)

Jordan (March 2000)

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K

Kazakhstan (2001)

Kenya (May 1980, August 1985, September 1995)

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L

Lativa (September 1993)

Lebanon (May 1997)

Lesotho (September 1988)

Liechtenstein (September 1985)

Lithuania (September 1993)

Luxembourg (May 1985)

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M

Madagascar (April 1989)

Malawi (April 1989)

Mali (January 1990)

Malta (May 1990, 2001)

Mauritius (October 1989)

Mexico (January 1979, May 1990, August 1993, January 1999, July 2002)

Morocco (August 1985)

Mozambique (September 1988)

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N

Netherlands (May 1985)

New Zealand (November 1986)

Nicaragua (March 1983, February 1996)

Nigeria (February 1982, March 1998)

Norway (June 1989)

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P

Pakistan (February 1981)

Palestinian Territories (2000)

Panama (March 1983)

Papua New Guinea (May 1984, January 1995)

Paraguay (May 1988)

Peru (January 1985, May 1988)

Philippines (February 1981, January 1995)

Poland (June 1979, June 1983, June 1987, June 1991, August 1991, May 1995, May 1997, June 1999, August 2002)

Portugal (May 1982, March 1983, May 1991, May 2000)

Puerto Rico (October 1984)

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R

Reunion Island (1989)

Romania (May 1999)

Rwanda (September 1990)

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S

Saint Lucia (July 1986)

San Marino (August 1982)

Sao Tome and Principe (June 1992)

Senegal (February 1992)

Seychelles (November 1986)

Singapore (November 1986)

Slovakia (June 1995, September 2003)

Slovenia (May 1996, September 1999)

Solomon Islands (May 1984)

South Africa (September 1995)

South Korea (May 1984, October 1989)

Spain (October 1982, October 1984, August 1989, June 1993, May 2003)

Sri Lanka (January 1995)

Sudan (February 1993)

Swaziland (September 1988)

Sweden (June 1989)

Switzerland (June 1982, June 1984, September 1985, June 2004)

Syria (2001)

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T

Tanzania (September 1990)

Thailand (May 1984)

Togo (August 1985)

Trinidad and Tobago (January 1985)

Tunisia (April 1996)

Turkey (November 1979)

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U

Uganda (February 1993)

Ukraine (2001)

United States (September 1979, February 1981, May 1984, September 1987, August 1993, October 1995, January 1999)

Uruguay (March 1987, May 1988)

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V

Venezuela (January 1985, February 1996)

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Z

Zaire (May 1980, August 1985)

Zambia (April 1989)

Zimbabwe (September 1988)

 

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Millions worldwide pray for pope

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/04/01...yers/index.html

 

 

 

Saturday, April 2, 2005 Posted: 10:10 AM EST (1510 GMT)

 

 

 

PARIS, France (AP) -- Around the world, the faithful lit candles, prayed and reflected on Pope John Paul II's legacy Saturday as he neared death. Some worshippers hoped for a dignified end to his suffering.

 

Sports-mad Italy suspended all weekend sport events -- including Serie A soccer, a playoff for the Italian ice hockey title, basketball and volleyball league matches, and amateur sports -- as a sign of respect for the critically ill pontiff.

 

After the long agony of John Paul's very public battle with failing health, some prayed death would come peacefully. At Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, worshippers and tourists lit candles beneath a photo of the pope from 1997 that recalled his earlier vigor.

 

"It's a time of sadness and a real time of reflection on what the pope has done in his 26 years as pope," said Mike Miller, an American visitor. "A really great man, and it's a very somber time."

 

Candlelit photos of John Paul also were displayed in London's Westminster Cathedral, at a basilica in Algiers, and at Vienna's St. Stephen's Cathedral. There, Regina Fischer said that while she was not a regular churchgoer, the pope's suffering moved her to pray.

 

"I want him not to get better, but to have a death with dignity," she said.

 

The pope's condition was front page news across much of Asia but not in China, where the state-run media ignored it. Beijing's communist government broke ties with the Vatican in 1951 and worship is allowed only in state-approved churches, and millions of Chinese Catholics, risking arrest, belong to unofficial congregations loyal to Rome.

 

Even as John Paul lay gravely ill, the Vatican said Saturday that Chinese authorities recently arrested three officials from China's nongovernment controlled Catholic Church.

 

Beijing worshipper Li Guojun said he wished China would resolve its dispute with the Vatican.

 

"You do not have to believe in God, but why do you fear the pope?" Li said. "Politicians talk about human rights a lot, why don't they consider the thought of so many Catholics?"

 

In Pakistan, a mainly Muslim country that the pope visited in 1981, children lit candles as their tearful teachers and many others gathered at a Roman Catholic church in the central city of Multan to pray.

 

In the small northern Iraq town of Tel Kief, a crumbling village of mud-brick homes bearing crosses above front entryways, Chaldean Catholics also offered prayers. Tel Kief is 20 kilometers (12 miles) north of Mosul, Iraq's third-largest city.

 

"We feel very bad about the pope, but this is the choice of God," said Adel Changu, a 55-year old Chaldean. "The Pope represents love for everyone. He is a link between God and people. He only wants peace for the people and he doesn't pay attention to their differences," said the shopkeeper as U.S. Army soldiers patrolled the narrow, rubbish-strewn streets outside.

 

In Croatia, where nearly 90 percent of the 4.5 million people consider themselves Roman Catholics, President Stipe Mesic canceled a trip so he could monitor news about the pope. Croatians flocked to churches.

 

Some 1,500 people gathered at the famous 13th-century Gothic cathedral in Cologne, Germany.

 

At Westminster Cathedral in London, Bishop Alan Hopes said John Paul "has been on a journey throughout his life and this is his final journey."

 

"He has said he has been searching for God all his life and now He has come to him. I think he is at rest in that," Hopes said at Mass.

 

At a noon Mass in St. Mary's basilica in Wadowice, the southern Polish town of 20,000 where the pope was born 84 years ago, the Rev. Krzysztof Glowka told a packed church that "we are here to be with John Paul in his agony, to experience, together with him, this great mystery of life that is death."

 

"Now as a sick and dying person he is teaching us the most important lesson, the lesson of dying and the lesson of perseverance," he said.

 

A dozen elderly women prayed for John Paul through the night in St. Mary's. As the sun rose, townspeople and foreigners joined them, including Croats who made a detour from a trip to Prague to pray for the pontiff in the church where he was baptized.

 

"This has been the longest morning for me in my entire life," said Jadwiga Byrska, a retiree. "Everything is in God's hands now."

 

The first non-Italian pope in centuries, John Paul had a manner that made people around the world think of him as their own.

 

Even non-Catholics embraced John Paul, crediting him for ending wars, spreading democracy and combating religious animosity. He transformed the papacy from an arbiter of religious doctrine to a global advocate for peace, understanding and responsibility.

 

"Jean Paul II has been was excellent pope," said Alfred Donath, head of the Swiss Confederation of Hebrew Congregations.

 

"He worked to bring Jews and the Catholic Church closer together. He was the first pope to visit a synagogue. He also traveled to Israel and visited the Wailing Wall," he said. "We'll never forget that he presented his excuses to the victims of the Holocaust for the attitude of Catholics during the Second World War."

 

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What it takes to become pope

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(CNN) -- In theory, any practicing Roman Catholic man can be the pope. In reality, the pope has for centuries been chosen from within the Sacred College of Cardinals.

 

But little is known beyond speculation about who will be the next pope. There are candidates that are discussed but the cardinals do not address the issue seriously until the pope dies, said Father Thomas Reese in a CNN interview in 2005. Reese, editor-in-chief of the weekly Catholic magazine "America" and a CNN analyst, is the author of "Inside the Vatican: The Politics and Organization of the Catholic Church."

 

"There's three or four Italians that are being spoken of, a couple Africans, three or more Latin American cardinals that are being mentioned," Reese said. "No Americans, however, are on anybody's list."

 

Reese said three factors will be important in the selection of the next pope, and the first is age.

 

"The cardinals clearly won't choose a young man," Reese said. John Paul II was pope for more than 20 years -- double the average term for popes in this century -- and Reese said many cardinals agree that having another such pope is "not a good idea."

 

But Reese said the cardinals aren't likely to choose an older man who could become as ill as John Paull II was in his final years.

 

"I think they will look for someone between 65 and 72 years of age," he said. "Sixty-five was the average age of popes elected in the 20th century, with John Paul II the youngest and John XXIII the oldest."

 

Second, the next pope must speak a number of languages. English, which has become the world language, is a must, as is Italian, since the pope is also the bishop of Rome.

 

"Third, he's got to have a public presence," Reese said. "He can't be a media disaster, because so much of the media will be focused on him."

Never a Jesuit pope

 

Reese speculated that John Paul II's successor will support John Paul II's policies but will also want to limit the power of the Vatican bureaucracy and decentralize decision-making in the church.

Pope election

The next pope is likely to continue John Paul II's work.

 

Also, there has never been a Jesuit pope. Indeed, the word "Jesuit" has at times been used as a pejorative suggesting a scheming politico and reflects a long-standing distrust of the church's most intellectual and freethinking of orders.

 

The possibility of a black pope exists. Cardinal Francis Arinze has been mentioned a potential successor. A Vatican insider, Arinze was close to John Paul II.

 

Choosing a black pope might strengthen the church's appeal in the developing world. The last black pope was Gelasius I, who was pope between 492 and 496.

 

Arinze also has the distinction of being baptized by Father Cyprian, a Nigerian priest whom the pope beatified. Beatification is the first step in a process that leads to sainthood.

 

Having a black pope who was baptized by a black saint leading the church into the third millennium would be a sensational stroke. But as scenarios go, it's unlikely.

 

As the Rev. Richard P. McBrien, a professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame, told the Boston Herald, "We're not going to have a black pope. ... The church won't make two bold moves in a row."

 

John Paul II, a Pole, was the first non-Italian pope in 456 years, but published reports suggest that the cardinals may be in the mood for another Italian.

 

Two possible Italian successors are Cardinal Camillo Ruini, the vicar general of the Rome diocese, and Cardinal Dionigi Tettamanzi, the archbishop of Milan.

 

But just who that might be is far from certain. As Robert Moynihan, editor and publisher of the magazine "Inside the Vatican," once said, "In the Vatican, those who talk don't know and those who know don't talk."

 

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Smoke over the Vatican: Picking the pope

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2005/pope/stor...cess/index.html

 

(CNN) -- There have been a number of methods for choosing a pope over the centuries since St. Linus, the second pope, replaced the apostle Peter -- St. Peter to Catholics -- in the year 67.

 

The first popes were chosen by local clergymen who lived near Rome, but kings, emperors and other interested bystanders have done what they could to influence the process as well. And there were times when those who were displeased with the outcome appointed their own man, who was known as the antipope.

 

But in 1059 Pope Nicholas II decreed that henceforth all papal electors must be cardinals, and in 1179 Pope Alexander III ruled that all cardinals would have an equal vote in the election.

 

In 1274, Pope Gregory X decided that the cardinals must meet within 10 days of a pope's death, and that they should be kept in strict seclusion until a pope was chosen.

 

By the late 1500s, most of the electoral procedures now used were in place.

 

The pope can be elected by one of three methods. A unanimous voice vote is permissible, as is the unanimous selection by the cardinals of a 9- to 15-member committee, which then must agree on a pope.

Tellers and tallies

 

The most common method, however, is election by ballot, which works as follows:

 

• When the pope dies, the dean of the Sacred College of Cardinals notifies the cardinals and calls a meeting -- always held in the morning -- that must begin no more than 20 days after the pope's death. However, the cardinals already in Rome must wait 15 days for those who are absent to travel to the Vatican. Once at the Vatican, the cardinals must remain there and cannot communicate with anyone outside the area where the election is taking place. The maximum number of cardinal electors cannot exceed 120.

 

• The cardinals draw lots to select three members to collect ballots from the infirm, three "tellers" to count the votes and three others to review the results.

Inauguration speech

John Paul II gives his inauguration speech.

 

• Blank ballots are then prepared and distributed.

 

• After writing the name of one man on his ballot, each of the active cardinals -- those under 80 years of age -- walks to an altar and pledges to perform his duty with integrity. He then places his ballot in a container, which is covered by a plate.

 

• After all votes are cast, the tellers tally the ballots and the result is read to the cardinals. If a cardinal receives two-thirds plus one of the vote, he is the new pontiff.

 

• If there is no winner, another vote is taken. If there is still no winner, two more votes are scheduled for the afternoon.

 

• After the votes are counted each time, the ballots are burned. If there has been no winner, a chemical is mixed with the ballots to produce black smoke when they are burned. Sight of the black smoke emerging from the roof of the Vatican Palace tells those waiting in St. Peter's Square that a pope has not yet been selected. When a winner has been selected, the ballots are burned alone, and the white smoke indicates there is a new pope.

 

• Traditionally, the winner had to garner two-thirds of the vote plus one, but John Paul II changed that in 1996. He ruled that if, after 12 or 13 days there is still no winner, the conclave could invoke a rule -- by majority vote -- that would permit the selection of the pope by an absolute majority.

 

• Once there is a winner, the pope-elect is asked if he accepts the decision. (Pope John Paul II reportedly accepted his election with tears in his eyes.) If he does, the dean asks what name he chooses and announces it to the cardinals, who then come forward to offer congratulations.

 

• The oldest cardinal then steps out on a balcony overlooking St. Peter's Square and says to the crowd, "Habemus papam" -- "We have a pope." He then introduces the pope, who steps out on the balcony to bless Rome and the world.

 

• Many popes have been formally installed with a coronation, but Pope John Paul II refused a coronation and was installed as the pope during a Mass in St. Peter's Square.

 

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Additional Pontiff articles:

 

Strict ritual in days after death

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/04/02...h.ap/index.html

 

 

(AP) -- The following is a look at the expected events in the days following a papal death.

 

 

Death

 

A pronouncement is made in Latin that the pope is dead and is certified by a physician.

 

The camerlengo, or chamberlain, then calls out the pontiff's baptismal name -- "Karol" for Pope John Paul II -- three times in a ritual to confirm there is no response. In the past, the camerlengo struck a silver hammer against the pope's forehead to confirm his death, but it's unclear if the ritual is still active.

 

The camerlengo then destroys the symbols of that papacy: the "Pescatorio," or Ring of the Fisherman, and the dies used to make lead seals for apostolic letters. The pope's quarters are sealed and funeral arrangements are begun by the camerlengo, the most important Vatican official until a new pope is elected. Spanish Cardinal Eduardo Martinez Somalo, 78, has been the camerlengo since 1993.

 

Vatican flags fly at half-staff. According to tradition, the Bronze Door at St. Peter's Basilica is closed.

 

 

Mourning period

 

An official nine-day mourning period, known as the "novemdiales," follows the death of a pope. The tradition dates back to ancient Rome and a ceremony held nine days after death. The pope's body lies in state in St. Peter's Basilica in the Clementine Chapel, which was begun by Michelangelo and completed by Giacomo Della Porta for the Jubilee in 1600.

 

After the death of John Paul I in 1978, an estimated 750,000 mourners filed past the body over three days. Many more could pay homage to John Paul II.

 

 

The funeral

 

The funeral and burial must be held between the fourth and sixth day after death except for unspecified "special reasons," according to rules established in 1996. Weather permitting, it will be held in St. Peter's Square. Many of the world's leaders and other dignitaries are expected to attend. Also on hand will be many of the Cardinals, who will select the new pope. During one part of the Mass, the ceremonial Swiss Guards, who wear distinctive purple-gold-and-red uniforms, kneel and dip their halberds with their right hand and salute with their left.

 

 

Burial

 

Most popes in recent centuries have chosen to be buried beneath St. Peter's Basilica. After the funeral, their lead-lined coffins -- which can weigh close to a half ton -- were carried through the "door of death" on the left side of the main altar in the basilica. A single bell is tolled. The coffin is lowered into a marble sarcophagus and covered by a huge stone slab. The Vatican has not clarified whether Pope John Paul II seeks such a burial. There is speculation that the Polish-born pontiff could choose to be interned in Krakow's Wavel Cathedral alongside Polish royalty.

 

 

Conclave

 

The Cardinals, the so-called "princes" of the church, gather to elect the new pope in the Sistine Chapel, whose frescoes include the famous ceiling by Michelangelo. The conclave, derived from the Latin words meaning "with a key," must begin no sooner than 15 days after the death of the pope and not more than 20. In the past, the Cardinals resided in makeshift sleeping quarters. For the next conclave, however, they will stay at St. Marthas House, a hotel-style guest facility within Vatican City.

 

The rules of the conclave are strict: no outside contact until a pope is elected. To counter modern eavesdropping devices, technicians will sweep the ancient halls and corridors for any telltale signs of surveillance. The cardinals file into the Sistine Chapel in their blood-red robes and conduct a private Mass before the voting begins. The ballots are tied together by needle and thread and burned with chemicals to make the smoke white or black. White signals to the world that a new pontiff has been elected. Only cardinals under the age of 80 are allowed to vote. A conclave held now would have 117 papal electors. The election of John Paul II took two days and eight ballots.

 

 

The next pope

 

John Paul II changed the rules to make a simple majority sufficient to elect a pope if no one gets the traditional two-thirds majority after 30 rounds of voting. Once a new pope is elected, he must say "Accepto," or I accept, to make it official. A senior cardinal will appear at the central window in St. Peter's Basilica and utter a sentence in Latin that ends with "Habemus papam" -- "We have a pope." Then he will continue in Latin and announce the name chosen by the new pope.

 

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U.S. political, religious leaders pay tribute to Pope John Paul II

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/04/02...tion/index.html

 

 

Saturday, April 2, 2005 Posted: 5:53 PM EST (2253 GMT)

 

(CNN) -- The following are statements from U.S. leaders and organizations on the death of Pope John Paul II:

 

 

 

U.S. President George W. Bush:

 

"The Catholic Church has lost its shepherd. The world has lost a champion of human freedom, and a good and faithful servant of God has been called home.

 

 

Former President William J. Clinton:

 

"Hillary and I are deeply saddened by the passing of His Holiness Pope John Paul II. In speaking powerfully and eloquently for mercy and reconciliation to people divided by old hatreds and persecuted by abuse of power, the Holy Father was a beacon of light not just for Catholics, but for all people. In more than 170 visits to over 115 countries, from the Balkans to the Middle East, from Central Africa to Asia, he was tireless in his efforts to defend human rights and human dignity. His remarkable journey from Wadowice, Poland, to the Vatican played an important role in hastening the downfall of communism. I will always treasure our five meetings in the U.S. and the Vatican, especially the deep concern His Holiness expressed over the suffering of the Bosnians and of religious liberty throughout the world.

 

"His Holiness is now at home with God, whom he served so faithfully for a lifetime."

 

 

Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, Archbishop of Washington:

 

"This was an extraordinary man. He was brilliant. If he had never become pope, Karol Wojtyla would have gone down, I think, as one of the major Catholic philosophers of the 20th century. ... I think that he was a strong leader, he was a brilliant guide, but more than anything else, I think, he was a man who loved people. And people understood that and people reacted to that."

 

Monsignor James Moroney, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops:

 

"He had both the faith in Christ and the humility of Christ that was so attractive to people. ... He always had a love not for the most powerful person in Rome, not for the most influential person in Rome, but just like Christ did, for the littlest and the most innocent and the most forgotten."

 

Bishop Joseph Galante, diocese of Camden, New Jersey:

 

"The Holy Father had a wonderful sense of humor. He was very easy to talk to."

 

The Rev. Franklin Graham, Protestant evangelist and president of Samaritan's Purse:

 

"The forgiveness of this man -- this is huge. For him to go into the prison and meet with a man that tried to kill him and to forgive him, this is an example, of course, that Christ gave from the cross when he said, 'Forgive them, Father, for they know not what they do.' For him to go into the prison and to forgive this man and speak to him, and pray with him, was a great example to all of us. We need to forgive and move on in life, and John Paul II certainly did that -- and that is a great example to everyone."

 

The Council on American-Islamic Relations:

 

"Muslims worldwide respected Pope John Paul II as an advocate for justice and human rights. His message of international peace and interfaith reconciliation is one that will reverberate for decades to come. We offer our sincere condolences to members of the Roman Catholic Church and to all those who seek a more peaceful world."

 

The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America:

 

"Pope John Paul II was the first pope to visit a synagogue, in April of 1986, as he visited the Orthodox Synagogue in Rome. The Jewish community had long called for diplomatic relations between Israel and the Holy See and in 1993-1994 Pope John Paul II announced formalization of these. Moreover, he was the first pope to visit the president of Israel at his residence and the chief rabbis of Israel at the Rabbinate.

 

"He was a pope for the ages. We fervently hope that the goodwill between the Jewish and Catholic communities that was engendered by the historic steps taken by Pope John Paul II will resonate among us in perpetuity and that his memory will be a constant inspiration for world peace and harmony."

 

 

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice:

 

"At the time when communism was breaking down finally, and needed strong people who were prepared to push those boulders aside, and to make it possible for tyranny to end in Europe, the pope was one of the most important spokesmen for, and really one of the most important actors in, that great drama. ... If you look at what happened in 1989 and 1990 and 1991, you cannot help but recognize the tremendous contribution of Pope John Paul II to those dramatic events and, therefore, to freedom."

 

Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tennessee and Senate Majority Leader:

 

"Pope John Paul was a man driven by faith, and his bold and impassioned leadership revolutionized the papacy. Guided by the truths of eternal tradition, he was a man of great conscience who was vigorous and engaged with many issues affecting the church and the world community. Though his body may have declined in recent years, his mind and spirit remained active. He led the church with dignity, grace and purpose. ... The Catholic Church has lost a great Pope, and the world community has lost a great leader and friend. May God bless his memory."

 

Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Massachusetts:

 

"I join my fellow Catholics and people everywhere in grieving the passing of the Holy Father. He was a devout and beloved spiritual leader for the Church who inspired people of all faiths and brought us closer to the great goal of peace on Earth. Even in his last days when he could not speak, he still was a strong moral voice heeded across the globe."

 

Sen. John Kerry, D-Massachusetts:

 

"Drawing upon his enduring moral strength and conviction, Pope John Paul II advanced the cause of solidarity in his native Poland and helped to topple communism around the world. We will never forget the example he set by forgiving the man who tried to take his life, and by praying at the Western Wall to ask Jews for their forgiveness. He traveled to places forgotten by all but God to pray for the sick and the poor, and millions turned out to hear his voice, even when strained. In death, as in life, his incredible spirit provides every Catholic with strength and his memory provides us with wisdom."

 

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-New York:

 

"John Paul II's authority as a force for democracy, tolerance and forgiveness around the world flowed not from his title, but from the man who bore it: his unmatched intellect, his infinite heart, and his boundless faith carried forth his message of love and hope through even the bleakest of circumstances and the darkest of days. ... He leaves behind a world that is more tolerant and more hopeful for the bequest of his remarkable life."

 

Sen. Norm Coleman, R-Minnesota:

 

"Pope John Paul II was a witness to hope, a force for freedom and a powerful and unyielding voice for the world's poor, oppressed and unprotected. He was a good and faithful shepherd and servant. ... The world is a better place thanks to Pope John Paul II. We will miss him."

 

Rep. Dennis Hastert, R-Illinois, House speaker:

 

"Pope John Paul II was a healer and a beacon of light around the world advocating for the poor, the oppressed and the unborn. He was and continues to be an inspiration to not only the 1 billion members of the Catholic Church but also to all other people of faith around the world."

 

Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-California House minority leader:

 

"Pope John Paul II was passionate in his commitment to doing God's work here on earth, seeking peace and justice for all. His deeds, his words, and his indomitable spirit of love were a blessing to this world.

 

"Pope John Paul II was a man of God, and he was also a man of the people. He was a source of hope to so many, and he honored that devotion by traveling the world to reach out to people of all ages, nationalities and faiths."

 

Rep. Tom DeLay, R-Texas and House Majority Leader:

 

"Today we lost a hero of our age. Karol Wojtyla lived and died a warrior-saint, and we remember with joy and gratitude his service to mankind. At the news of his death, we mourn, we pray, and we bow our heads in thanks that such men ever live. He was more than a good and holy man: He was a lion. May God receive His humble servant."

 

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter:

 

"Rosalynn and I are saddened by the passing of His Holiness, Pope John Paul lI. A man shaped by his own experience under Nazi occupation during World War II, he dedicated his life and vocation as instruments of peace throughout the world. His was a constant voice for justice, nonviolence, and reconciliation for both individuals and nations. As a spiritual leader, he emphasized the common humanity of people of all faiths. His advocacy for the poor and oppressed will prevail as a source of hope and inspiration for others to follow. We will remember him with love and gratitude for his faithfulness to peace and human rights."

 

Former U.S. first lady Nancy Reagan:

 

"Pope John Paul II ... touched the hearts of young and old, bringing tears to the eyes of those inspired by his very presence. He provided unparalleled leadership to his church and gave hope to those who had none."

 

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Bush: Pope 'a champion of human dignity'

http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/04/02/bus...e.ap/index.html

 

 

Saturday, April 2, 2005 Posted: 1:22 PM EST (1822 GMT)

 

 

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Bush on Saturday called Pope John Paul II "a faithful servant of God and a champion of human dignity and freedom."

 

"He is an inspiration to us all," Bush said in his weekly radio address. "Laura and I join millions of Americans and so many around the world who are praying for the Holy Father."

 

The president has received regular briefings about the pontiff's condition since the pope's health began deteriorating Thursday. The Vatican, describing the pope's health status as "very grave," said he showed the first signs of losing consciousness at dawn on Saturday.

 

Bush, who was spending the weekend at the White House, was in the Oval Office before 7 a.m. EST Saturday. In addition to getting his usual national security and intelligence briefings, Bush was getting updates on the pope from senior aides, spokesman Ken Lisaius said.

 

Bush normally tapes his radio address on Friday for its broadcast Saturday morning.

 

This time, the wait for developments out of Vatican City had the president holding off until shortly before the broadcast to tape the address in which he mentioned the pope.

 

The focus of the rest of the address was this week's release of a scathing report by a presidential commission on America's intelligence apparatus.

 

Bush said he administration would act on the many "thoughtful and extremely significant" recommendations from the commission so those agencies can better predict threats and assess the capabilities of America's adversaries.

 

But he also highlighted what he said were the government's positive actions. "To win the war on terror, we will correct what needs to fixed and build on what the commission calls solid intelligence successes," he said.

 

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'A witness to the dignity of human life'

http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/04/02/bush.reax/index.html

 

 

Bush: Pope one of great leaders in human history

 

Saturday, April 2, 2005 Posted: 6:09 PM EST (2309 GMT)

 

 

 

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Bush remembered Pope John Paul II on Saturday as one of history's great leaders.

 

Standing at the White House with his wife beside him, less than two hours after the pontiff died, the president said, "The Catholic Church has lost its shepherd. The world has lost a champion of human freedom. And a good and faithful servant of God has been called home."

 

"All popes belong to the world but Americans had special reason to love the man from Krakow," Bush said. "Pope John Paul II was himself an inspiration to millions of Americans and to so many more throughout the world.

 

"We will always remember the humble, wise and fearless priest who became one of history's great moral leaders."

 

Senior officials have told CNN the president intends to go to the pontiff's funeral. The White House said it is waiting to hear from the Vatican before deciding on the U.S. delegation.

 

Bush ordered U.S. flags at federal buildings and facilities to be flown at half-staff until sunset on the day of the pope's burial.

 

Bush had visited the last June and during the trip had sought the Vatican's help in urging U.S. bishops to support his conservative social agenda. While the two men agreed on social issues, like their opposition to gay marriage and abortion, the pope had condemned the U.S. war in Iraq and the death penalty, two issues on which Bush stood firm.

 

Bush said in his televised statement that the pope "reminded us of our obligation to build a culture of life, in which the strong protect the weak. And during the pope's final years, his witness was made even more powerful by his daily courage in the face of illness and great suffering."

 

In his weekly radio address earlier Saturday, President Bush called the pope an "inspiration to us all" and said that he, the first lady and "millions of Americans joined so many around the world to pray."

 

 

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INSTANT VIEW-Reaction to the death of Pope John Paul

http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/news/story.jsp...=20020528NYP177

 

VATICAN CITY, April 2 (Reuters) - Pope John Paul died on Saturday.

 

The following are comments from world leaders and others on the Pope's death:

 

Leaders

 

GEORGE W. BUSH, U.S. PRESIDENT:

 

"The Catholic Church has lost its shepherd. The world has lost a champion of human freedom and a good and faithful servant of God has been called home.

 

Pope John Paul II was himself an inspiration to millions of Americans and to so many more throughout the world ... We're grateful to God for sending such a man, a son of Poland, who became the bishop of Rome and a hero for the ages."

 

KOFI ANNAN, UNITED NATIONS SECRETARY-GENERAL:

 

"I recall very fondly my meetings with him, particularly sitting with him in his private quarters discussing the question of war and peace when we were thinking about what to do in Kosovo.

 

"He ... (was) extremely concerned about the world we lived in, and like me, he also felt that in war, all are losers."

 

JACQUES CHIRAC, FRENCH PRESIDENT:

 

"This bereavement strikes the whole Catholic Church, which he led to the doorway to the third millennium with an unshakeable faith, exemplary authority and admirable passion."

 

GERHARD SCHROEDER, GERMAN CHANCELLOR:

 

"He influenced the peaceful integration of Europe during his pontificate in many ways. Time and again he acted with wisdom and respect for cultures and people's traditions to develop solutions to humanity's problems.

 

TONY BLAIR, BRITISH PRIME MINISTER:

 

"The world has lost a religious leader who was revered across people of all faiths and none. He was an inspiration, a man of extraordinary faith, dignity and courage.

 

Throughout a hard and often difficult life, he stood for social justice and on the side of the oppressed, whether as a young man facing the Nazi occupation in Poland or later in challenging the communist regime."

 

SHIMON PERES, ISRAELI VICE PREMIER:

 

"Pope John Paul II ... exhibited not only a big spirit but a good one. Even though he represented Catholicism, he managed, with his talent and personality, to also represent our entire global partnership."

 

OLUSEGUN OBASANJO, PRESIDENT OF NIGERIA:

 

"Pope John Paul II not only visited Nigeria twice but stood by the country in its fight against dictatorship and injustice."

 

PAUL MARTIN, PRIME MINISTER OF CANADA:

 

"Unforgettable ... were his visits to Quebec, as well as his participation in the World Youth Day in Toronto in July of 2002, which inspired hundreds of thousands of young people with the strength and clarity of his moral vision."

 

BERTIE AHERN, IRISH PRIME MINISTER:

 

"I wonder whether all the changes would have happened in eastern Europe if he'd not been there for the last quarter of a century. I don't think it would have. I think he had a powerful influence on that change."

 

HUGO CHAVEZ, PRESIDENT OF VENEZUELA:

 

"For us Catholics, John Paul II will be remembered as a traveling Pope ... and we should also remember he preached world peace. When the United States invaded Iraq, for example, John Paul II said it was an illegal and immoral act."

 

JOSE MANUEL BARROSO, EU COMMISSION PRESIDENT:

 

"John Paul II will be remembered as someone who played an essential role in the reunification of Europe and in the advance of ideas of freedom and democracy in our continent. Europeans will never forget his struggle for peace and human dignity."

 

BRITAIN'S QUEEN ELIZABETH IN BUCKINGHAM PALACE STATEMENT:

 

"Her majesty remembers the untiring efforts of Pope John Paul II in promoting peace and goodwill throughout the world."

 

Former leaders

 

BILL CLINTON, FORMER U.S. PRESIDENT:

 

"In speaking powerfully and eloquently for mercy and reconciliation to people divided by old hatreds and persecuted by abuse of power, the Holy Father was a beacon of light not just for Catholics, but for all people."

 

HENRY KISSINGER, FORMER U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE:

 

"John Paul II was one of the greatest men of the last century. Perhaps the greatest."

 

LECH WALESA, FORMER POLISH PRESIDENT AND SOLIDARITY LEADER: "I think we shall keep discovering how much the Holy Father worked for us and struggled for us. He spoke to us through his illness and through his suffering served to the very end ... (Without him) there would be no end of communism or at least much later and the end would have been bloody."

 

TADEUSZ MAZOWIECKI, POLAND'S FIRST NON-COMMUNIST PRIME MINISTER:

 

"The greatest and maybe the only authority is gone. An era is over forever but his wisdom will also last forever."

 

MARGARET THATCHER, FORMER BRITISH PRIME MINISTER:

 

"By combating the falsehoods of communism and proclaiming the true dignity of the individual, his was the moral force behind victory in the Cold War."

 

Religious leaders

 

CARDINAL THEODORE MCCARRICK, ARCHBISHOP OF WASHINGTON:

 

"In a certain sense he was 'American'. He enjoyed people. He had a great sense of humour. He was humble, all the things that America likes in their leaders, and I think we saw that in him, therefore we became very close to him.

 

CARDINAL DARIO CASTRILLON OF COLUMBIA, CONSIDERED A POSSIBLE SUCCESSOR TO THE POPE:

 

"He is in glory while we continue in the church, following the paths of Christ."

 

ROWAN WILLIAMS, ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY:

 

Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, spiritual head of the world's 77 million Anglicans, was swift to pay his respects, calling him "a leader of manifest holiness and a faithful and prayerful friend of the Anglican Church."

 

Dissenting views

 

PETER TATCHELL, BRITISH GAY AND HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVIST:

 

"Historians will judge the Pope harshly. His opposition to the use of condoms to prevent the spread of HIV has condemned millions of people to die an agonising, needless death.

 

Millions of children in developing countries are orphaned, having lost their parents to AIDS because of the Pope's anti-condom dogma."

 

JERZY URBAN, EX-SPOKESMAN OF POLAND'S PAST COMMUNIST RULERS:

 

"As a godless atheist I never cared much for the church or the papacy. I disliked the fact that the papacy bore down so heavily on Poland. Now I fear that a cult will emerge after his death."

 

Ordinary people

 

STANISLAW WITEK, 56, AN ELECTRICIAN IN THE POPE'S HOMETOWN OF WADOWICE:

 

"I have work waiting for me in Belgium, but I think I'll be going to Rome. I cannot explain it. I've never met him, but he is someone who simply radiates a force. There has never been such a Pole as him and there will never be."

 

FERNANDO TEIXEIRA, LISBON, PORTUGAL:

 

"He was a saint. He will stay in everyone's hearts. He was always a fighter, up until the hour of his death. He is at peace.,"

 

BEATRICE SUCRE, 66, HOUSEWIFE, VENEZUELA

 

"He was a great Pope, very controversial. But then life is controversial. I don't think there'll be big changes. The Church doesn't end just because one Pope dies. I've known five."

 

- - - -

04/02/05 17:22

 

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Clergy, dignitaries pay respects to pope

Plans laid for burial and successor's selection

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/04/03...main/index.html

 

 

Sunday, April 3, 2005 Posted: 2:22 PM EDT (1822 GMT)

 

 

VATICAN CITY (CNN) -- Cardinals, archbishops and diplomatic dignitaries solemnly filled the Sala Clementina of the Apostolic Palace to pay their respects Sunday to Pope John Paul II, his body dressed in red and white papal robes with his bishop's staff under one arm.

 

The pope's body will be moved Monday to the Sala Bologna at St. Peter's Basilica, where the pontiff will lie in state until his funeral, to be held in four to six days.

 

The pope died from septic shock and cardiocirculatory collapse, the Vatican said Sunday.

 

Earlier Sunday, tens of thousands of mourners filled St. Peter's Square for the first of nine elaborate Masses marking the death of the pope.

 

"We entrust with confidence to the risen Christ, Lord of life and history, our beloved John Paul II who for 27 years guided the universal church as the successor of Peter," said the Mass's celebrant, Cardinal Angelo Sodano.

 

Sodano said he was at the pope's bedside as he died, and that the pontiff died serenely.

 

"Serenity is the fruit of faith," he added.

 

Elsewhere, other bishops and cardinals uttered similar words praising the life and papacy of the man who came to Rome as Cardinal Karol Wojtyla at age 58, leaving the city Saturday evening at 84.

 

"Pope John Paul has finished the course, has run the race, has kept the faith," said Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O'Connor, Archbishop of Westminster, at Westminster Cathedral in London. "Farewell, Pope John Paul, as the thoughts, the memories and the prayers of the world and of all Christian people go with you."

 

Rome police, who are used to handling large throngs at the Vatican, were bracing for up to 2 million people during that city's three days of official mourning through the time a new pope is announced.

 

As condolences poured in from around the world, plans also were being laid for the pope's burial and the selection of his successor.

 

The first General Congregation of Cardinals was to meet at 10 a.m. (4 a.m. ET) Monday in the Apostolic Palace to make decisions on the burial time and other details.

 

The Vatican has not said if John Paul II left instructions for his funeral or burial. Most popes have asked to be buried below St. Peter's Basilica. But the Polish-born pope may have wanted to be laid to rest in his homeland.

 

Within 20 days of John Paul II's death, Catholic cardinals from across the globe will gather to participate in a sacred ritual that, for many of them, could be a once-in-a-lifetime event -- the election of a new pope.

 

There were 24-hour vigils and special services in many major cities following the pope's death Saturday night.

 

"I feel like a daughter who lose her father," one young woman told CNN in St. Peter's Square.

 

The 84-year-old pope died Saturday night in his private apartment.

 

The pope's condition began deteriorating rapidly Thursday, after a urinary tract infection caused a high fever and led to septic shock and collapse of his cardiocirculatory system.

 

He suffered from a number of chronic illnesses, including crippling hip and knee ailments and Parkinson's disease, a progressive neurological disorder that can make breathing and swallowing difficult.

 

"The Catholic Church has lost its shepherd," U.S. President George Bush said at the White House, with his wife, Laura, standing alongside him. "The world has lost a champion of human freedom, and a good and faithful servant of God has been called home.

 

"We will always remember the humble, wise and fearless priest who became one of history's great moral leaders."

 

Bush ordered the U.S. flags at all federal buildings and facilities to be flown at half-staff until sunset on the day of the pope's interment.

 

U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said he felt privileged to have met the pope.

 

"Quite apart from his role as a spiritual guide to more than a billion men, women and children, he was a tireless advocate of peace, a true pioneer in interfaith dialogue and a strong force for critical self-evaluation by the Church itself," Annan said.

 

Lech Walesa, who led Poland's Solidarity movement to power after a decade of struggle, said the Polish-born John Paul inspired the drive to end communism in Eastern Europe.

 

"[Without him] there would be no end of communism or at least [it would have happened] much later, and the end would have been bloody," Walesa said. (More world reaction)

 

"I have a very strange feeling of loss. I almost feel as though one of my family members has gone," evangelist Billy Graham told CNN's Larry King Saturday night.

 

"I loved him very much, and had the opportunity of discussing so many things with him, and we wrote each other several times during the years."

 

The Dalai Lama, the Tibetan spiritual leader, said in a written statement that he had "deep appreciation for the pope's mission to bring peace to the world.

 

"In spite of increasing age and declining physical health, his relentless efforts to visit different parts of the world and meet the people who lived there to promote harmony and spiritual values, exemplified not only his deep concern but also the courage he brought to fulfilling it."

 

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A Last Audience With the Pope

TIME talks to a Cardinal who met with John Paul II just two hours before he died

By JEFF ISRAELY

http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8...00.html?cnn=yes

 

Saturday, Apr. 02, 2005

Edmund Cardinal Szoka, a Polish-American who heads the government of Vatican City, was one of just four Cardinals called to the bedside of Pope John Paul II in the papal apartment on Friday. TIME’s Jeff Israely spoke at length Saturday with Szoka, 77, the former Archbishop of Detroit, as he sat in his office inside Vatican city:

 

 

TIME: Please tell us about your visit with the Holy Father.

 

Szoka: At about 9:20 a.m. I got a call from the Pope's personal secretary Archbishop [stanislaw] Dziwisz, who asked if I could come at once to see the Pope.

 

TIME: What were you thinking when you got that call?

 

Szoka: My first thought was to wonder if this could be the end, if he was really dying.

 

 

 

TIME: What happened when you got the Pope's apartment?

 

Szoka: Archbishop Dziwisz met me at the door and took me in the room. The Holy Father was lying in his bed, but they had his head propped up with pillows. There were three doctors alongside the bed and his five Polish nuns standing along the wall. [The pope] was having real trouble breathing. But he was perfectly alert. When he saw me I could tell he recognized me, it was like his eyes lit up and then he sort of bowed his head. I went and kneeled at his bedside and kissed his hand. I told him that I had said Mass for him and that the whole world was praying for him. I stayed on my knees the whole time I was in there, maybe no more than 10 minutes. But when I got up to leave, you know I'm a priest, so I'm used to blessing people, sick people. So I instinctively blessed him, and touched his head. And then he did the sign of the cross. That was a moment I will never forget.

 

TIME: What is the meaning in the way the Pope has faced illness?

 

Szoka: He's not afraid to show that he's sick. In the past, the Vatican didn't even like to admit that the Pope was even sick. They'd say he has the flu. John Paul has never tried to hide his condition.

 

TIME: How will John Paul be remembered?

 

Szoka: He's changed the way Popes act. In the past they were more distant. He had a great desire to minister to people. After him Popes cannot go back to staying inside their walls.

 

TIME: What characteristics should the next Pope have?

 

Szoka: It will have to be a Pope who wants to be among the people. But there's only one John Paul II. You can't clone a Pope.

 

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Text of Pope John Paul II's Prayer

http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/news/story.jsp...932.htm&sc=1103

 

 

The text of the prayer read by Archbishop Leonardo Sandri Sunday at a Mass at St. Peter's Square. Sandri said Pope John Paul II had prepared the prayer himself before he died Saturday.

 

Dearest Brothers and Sisters!

 

The joyous Hallelujah of Easter resonates today too. Today's page of John's Gospel emphasizes that he who was Resurrected, the evening of that day, appeared before the Apostles and ``showed them his hands and his side'' (John 20,20), that is, the signs of the painful passion that were marked indelibly onto his body even after the resurrection. Those glorious wounds, which eight days later he made the unbelieving Thomas touch, reveal the mercy of God who ``so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son'' (John, 3, 16).

 

This mystery of love is at the center of today's liturgy of Sunday in Albis, dedicated to the cult of Divine Mercy.

 

To humanity, which at times appears lost and dominated by the power of evil, of selfishness and fear, the Lord resurrected offers as a gift his forgiving love, reconciles and reopens the spirit to hope. It is a love that converts hearts and gives peace. How much need the world has to understand and receive Divine Mercy!

 

Oh Lord, who with your death and resurrection reveal the love of the Father, we believe in You and with confidence we repeat today: Jesus, I trust in You, have mercy of us and the entire world.

 

The liturgic solemnity of the Annunciation, that we will celebrate tomorrow, pushes us to contemplate with the eyes of Mary the immense mystery of this merciful love that springs from the Heart of Christ. Helped by Her we can understand the true sense of the joy of Easter, which is based on this certainty: He whom the Virgin carried in her womb, who suffered and died for us, is truly resurrected. Hallelujah!

 

 

04/03/05 19:39

 

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World Faiths: Thread #193990

 

Pope John Paul II Modernized the Chur...

 

1 Apr-2 From: Dayhawk Kim To: ALL

 

 

 

Pope John Paul II Modernized the Church

 

As the third longest-serving pontiff in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, Pope John Paul II's place in history has been assured, not only for having brought more changes to the billion-member church than anyone in modern history. For what do you believe he is most likely to be remembered?

 

In his final hours, Pope John Paul II asked to remain in the Vatican, instead of being taken to a hospital, as he suffered from multiple organ failures and drifted in and out of consciousness. He battled the effects of Parkinson's disease and in many ways conquered it, touching the lives of so many millions at the risk of his own.

 

Elected in 1978 following the sudden death of John Paul I, who held that office for only a month, Karol Wojtyla was born in Poland in 1920, as the world emerged from its first global conflict. As his nation was plunged into World War II, the young man distinguished himself as a partisan, helping to protect his countrymen from the Nazi hordes who were plundering Europe.

 

Ordained a priest on November 1st, 1946, Father Karol immediately found himself immersed in a new battle to save Poland -- and much of the world -- from the menace of Communism. Many of those who had been victorious in fighting fascism now found their countries menaced by a new threat, that of godless Communism.

 

Spreading from Soviet Russia outward in every direction, Communism rapidly engulfed Father Karol's native Poland and much of Europe and Asia during the 1950's. Communism was still a threat both to churches and the faithful throughout the world at the time of the election and sudden death of John Paul I in 1971.

 

Defying predictions, papal electors named Karol Wojtyla to succeed to the papacy, becoming not only the first Polish-born pontiff, but also the first from a non-Italian state in more than five centuries.

 

Among his many achievements, one of the most memorable will be his more than one hundred trips outside Italy and the Vatican, cementing relationships with Catholics and non-Catholics alike around the world.

 

He also determined to make the Church more accessible, not only expanding the use of modern languages in bringing Christ's gospel to the world at large, but also in reaching out to new audiences, and particularly the young.

 

The pontiff took unprecedented initiatives to bridge the major faiths and seal the schism between the ancient and modern Catholic branches. He visited a synagogue, a mosque and the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

 

At interfaith gatherings he proudly displayed the banner of the power of faith and unity against war, terrorism and injustice. He demonstrated the power of prayer and personal faith by reforming the praying of the rosary and canonizing a record-number of lay people during his reign. He also named almost all the cardinals who will elect his successor.

 

His reign might have been cut short by an assassin's bullet in 1981, but the new Pope, who had chosen to commemorate his predecessor's tragically brief service by taking the name John Paul II, not only survived the bullet wound, he lived to visit his would-be assassin in jail.

 

While embracing many changes to help bring Catholicism into the 21st century, Pope John Paul II has steadfastly refused to yield on matters which he has declared articles of faith. That has disappointed some parishioners, including many women, for whom the pontiff has described a special role in the Church -- but not one including ordination as clergy.

 

Similarly, he has disappointed or even angered some of those seeking other changes in doctrine, including advocates for gay and lesbian causes.

 

This pope has also had to contend with one of the more vexing challenges to face the church, that of the abuse by a few disturbed clergy of children under their care. That scandal has cost the church mightily, both in financial terms and also in the confidence of many of the faithful. One of the great challenges which Pope John Paul II has faced in his declining years has been how precisely to deal with the scandal which threatened to engulf parts of the church in a moral and legal quagmire.

 

Future generations will, each in their turn, ascribe credit or fix blame for the monumental events which have surrounded the church during John Paul II's papacy, but surely among the most memorable for future generations will be the triumphant return of Karol Wojtyla to the nation of his birth, freed from the dictator's yoke and able to worship God freely and without fear for the first time in many decades.

 

What, in your view, will likely be most remembered by future generations about Pope John Paul II?

 

[Views expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect those of CompuServe, the Forum or any government, agency or news organization.]

 

2 Apr-2 From: thatshot427 To: ALL

 

 

 

I didnt really know the pope but it is really sad that he died casue all he wanted for the world is peace!! He was very old and was lucky that he could live that long to help our world! He went all over the world again to help with the peace issue!! So i say to the pope " May your soul rest in peice"

 

And may you rest in our hearts forever!

 

 

 

3 Apr-2 From: jimhobbins To: Dayhawk Kim

 

As an Episcopalian I have no direct ties to the Roman Catholic faith but as a Christian I am struck by the many times I have come down on the same side of many moral issues he addressed (abortion, homosexuality and the state use of the death penalty amid the most prominent).

 

The death of any person diminishes all of us and especially with a man of his strength and character. But I found it interesting to reflect on a vision I had of a young lady approaching Heaven's portals and, pointing behind her saying, "Look, I come to prepare the way", as Karol followed close behind. The Heavenly Gatekeeper nodding and saying, "Thank you Terri".

 

Jim

 

4 Apr-2 From: shrimo9 To: thatshot427

 

I agree the Pope did wonderful things in an unsure world I admire him alot.

 

5 Apr-2 From: paul26g To: ALL

 

It is always a sad day when anyone passes away. But I have to wonder why all the fuss over this one man when so many others pass every day?? Why do we not act this way when we hear of someone elses death?? After all, he was not choosen by God. He was just a man who was picked by other men to be the head of an organization.

 

6 Apr-2 From: life4teri To: thatshot427

 

It is a sad day to know our wonderful and gracious, spiritual and moral leader has died, but his legacy will live on through his followers and the Catholic church. I pray that his successor is as great as him in accomplishing the many things Pope John Paul II did and is also as dedicated to teaching from the Bible the many moral and spiritual teachings of Christ and his apostles. I hope we as christians can grow stronger in our faith and help lead others to Christ as Pope John Paul II dedicated his life to doing. May he rest peacefully with our Lord and the Angels and Saints he will become.

 

7 Apr-2 From: carali625 To: thatshot427

 

 

 

i am very sad of pope john paul the second has died. he was a great leader to me I ook up to him as a leader. he was one with god. its sad all he went through in life. your in my heart forever.

 

 

 

 

 

Michelle machado 11 years old

 

8 Apr-2 From: samily4u To: ALL

 

The world will miss one of the greatest popes that represented all people of the world. God rest his soul

 

9 Apr-2 From: brooklynbud69 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

John Paul's greatest achievement was taking the Catholic Church back to Vatican I. The reforms of Vatican II were completely obliterated. No, I will not mourn this man. He turned his head while thousands of priests were molesting young children and chastised thousands of followers because they did not meet with his neo-conservative views.

 

I pray that the new Pontiff will be more tolerant and take us forward, NOT back. The Catholic Church needs to move into the 21st Century. The challenges that lie ahead are many, but a progressive Pope can guide the Church with compassion and tolerance.

 

10 Apr-2 From: jjdouylliez To: thatshot427

 

 

 

Pope John Paul II was a great man and his loss will be felt by not only the Catholic Church but every church claiming to be Christian. Protestant Churches are not a part of the Catholic Church but we all have Catholic roots and we are all Christians believing in One triune God. He is the sole Head of the Church and his wisdom and guidance of the Church will be sorely missed.

 

Jacob Douylliez 15 years old

 

11 Apr-2 From: life4teri To: brooklynbud69

 

I pray our next spiritual and moral leader will follow the teachings of Jesus Christ and those represented by Pope John Paul II. We do not need a liberal, "progressive" pontiff who will shame God and the value of man and life.

 

12 Apr-2 From: sexibeez17 To: ALL

 

he was a good person and he will never be forgotten

 

13 Apr-2 From: bednarfp To: ALL

 

 

 

I was in Krakow, Poland, in August of 1987, and could see the great love that the Polish people had for Pope John Paul II, and the great appreciation that they had for both the Pope and our President Reagan's efforts to try to free Eastern Europe from the iron hand of the Soviet Union. They did become free two years later. I believe that event will hallmark his greatest accomplishment, and also for being a great communicator who traveled around the world to spread good will.

 

Pope John Paul II was truly gifted and blessed. He now belongs to the ages and will be remembered as the great Pope.

 

Fred

 

.

 

14 Apr-2 From: erh411706 To: paul26g

 

Now another group of red hats can elect a different man to sit in the isolation of Vatican City and try to have everyone adhere to his utterances. None of them know what goes on in the real world.

 

I say abolish the whole beurocracy and give the money back to the poor from whom it was stolen in the first place.

 

15 Apr-2 From: waving2uhello To: erh411706

 

 

Finally the Pope went to the old Pope's home. Amen

 

16 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: paul26g

 

 

 

WE MOURN BECAUSE HE WAS OUR LEADER LIVED BY EXAMPLE. HIS LIFE WAS TRUELY AMAZING EVEN WHEN HE WAS A BOY GROWING UP IN POLAND. IT IS A LOSS THAT MIRRORS THE PASSING OF A FAMILY MATRIARCH. MORE THAN THE HOLLYWOOD STARS MANY MOURN TODAY. AS TO HIM BEING CHOSEN BY MEN, THIS IS TRUE, HOWEVER THESE WERE MEN INSPIRED BY GOD JUST AS THE BIBLE ITSELF WAS WRITTEN BY MEN INSPIRED BY GOD.

 

17 Apr-2 From: trestt To: ALL

 

Only God knows his failures and he will be judged for all the evil he could have stopped but he chose not to. Among those the persecution and picking of the gay and lesbian community.

 

I hope the next Pope takes a look at the world in the way it has changed for good and follow suit. Althought I don't see much change coming.

 

 

18 Apr-2 From: alienbyrrd To: ALL

 

I am neither a Catholic, nor a Christian, but the world has lost a great man. As much as I have disagreed with some of his positions, I have had no choice but to listen and think. I remember his election. I remember what happenned in his homeland. I am sure that Mother Theresa has welcomed him with open arms. May he be blessed and kept within the loving arms of his God and his Saviour. Donna nobles pacem.

 

19 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: brooklynbud69

 

TIMES AND IDEAS MAY CHANGE HOWEVER GOD DOES NOT!!! SO HIS CHURCH SHOULD NOT EITHER.

 

20 Apr-2 From: deburninator222 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

i think saint john paul was a great pope, im only 12 and i admire his passion to follow it jesues's foot steps. i think and i hope that others to think this but i think that he was a caring and faithfull man to the church and to everyone.

 

 

 

21 Apr-2 From: robusky5 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

our prayer for great leader christain faiter i our time

 

love ray/pat robusky

 

from tulsa,ok usa

 

email address is ray7938@cox.net and robusky5@aol.com

 

22 Apr-2 From: Anne To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

Speaking as someone whose parents, brothers and (self) attended Catholic schools and universities, I do admire the many things you write about in your introductory passage.

 

However, I have to say that it has been years since I hae practiced as a Catholic and I am amazed that so little has been said about the following:

 

In 26 years as Pope, where was the compassion for potential victims of AIDS world wide when it came to the use of the condom to protect one from the virus? This Pope condemned the use of condoms and this powerful Church could have saved many lives by advocating the use of condoms.

 

Same with other methods of birth control. Only astinence is allowed (the ridiculous "rhythm" method.) So much for realistic birth control for women who need to use it.

 

Where was the clear, continuous, outspoken outrage from Rome for the sexual abuse of children and others by priests and religious. Yes, the Pope spoke out, but not much else happened. This is a disgrace.

 

Where is the compassion for the needs of gay people to partner in dignity?

 

 

23 Apr-2 From: Albert S. To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

To me personally the most important thing about John Paul II is while he was extremely conservative about doctrine, etc.-even rolling back some of the changes instituted by Vatican II-, he broke from the past in attempting a reconciliation between the Catholic Church and non-Catholics, stressing that the latters' beliefs should be worthy of respect.

 

Albert S.

 

24 Apr-2 From: glasscitydude To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

I am 28 years old and while I was born during the ponitificate of Paul VI and was an infant during the very brief reign of John Paul I, the only pope I have ever known is John Paul II.

 

As life has taken its twists and turns I have fond myself to be not an active meber of the Church. But in my heart and in my mind I always had a great respect and loyalty to this special man.

 

I was adopted as an infant in 1977 after my Catholic biological mother surrendered me for adoption. Her choice allowed me to have two beautiful parents and a really great life. When I was 10 or so I came to understand abortion and adoption and the tough decisions that the Holy Father championed. It felt as though this little Polish man in Rome were an advocate for my right to exist. As though he were promoting an understanding that even if I was the product of an "unplanned" (by humans) pregnancy, I was still very planned and wanted by God.

 

I was out to eat when I saw on the television that he had passed away. In spite of myself, I began to quietly cry. JPII was a hero to me in promoting socail justice and rights of those not yet born. Even when the world was against his thinking and his ideas were not popular I knew that he stood for little guys like me. He was our advocate and our defender.

 

Thanks JPII. I hope that from where you are you can really begin to see the good that you have done. We miss you.

 

Joseph Nixon

 

25 Apr-2 From: mrdl1230 To: thatshot427

 

 

 

Oh yea, this pope was just so accepting. Unless youre a woman and you want to be a priest. Can't do that, because women are inferior of course.

 

Anachronistic a-hole.

 

26 Apr-2 From: dthmtl3 To: jimhobbins

 

abortion can be a wonderful thing and the best decision in most cases for parents who cant afford to give a child a decent life and as long as the baby isnt to far along but also saves us space on the planet to not overpopulate from loose women who cant keep there legs closed or use birth control and dirty people who are to stupid to use protection and if you dont enjoy your std cause your an idiots

 

27 Apr-2 From: dariusjc220 To: paul26g

 

Paul, you must be one of the stupidest Americans ever, i swear, you really are

 

28 Apr-2 From: dariusjc220 To: waving2uhello

 

another stupid inbred American comment, grow up you moron !

 

29 Apr-2 From: laxerlou248 To: ALL

 

As a young Catholic, Pope John Paul II is the only pope I have known. Even though religion is a constant battle with other activities in a teenagers life, this Pope was like a rock star to my peers and I. In a way, he was the Jesus of the modern era, taking a bullet in the name of christ, just as Jesus took his life over two thousand years ago. We will always remember you and thank you to our dear pope, Lolek Wojtyla.

 

30 Apr-2 From: laxerlou248 To: mrdl1230

 

It doesn't sound like you would be, let's say, suitable to be a priest anyway, so stop being a hyprocrite and shut up. The least you could do is to thank such a great man who devoted his whole life to God. and yes, by the way, I too am a girl and totally accept the Catholic religion.

 

31 Apr-2 From: morashbob To: brooklynbud69

 

 

 

Try reading Scripture. You will find that although Christ brought a message of love to the world, He was quite conservative. The life He calls us to lead is not necessarily an easy one. The Church will maintain its stance on the traditional values taught to us by Christ and His Apostles. ... I thank the Lord that we had such a man as John Paul II to hold firm on what is right and moral. ... He was a simple man who stood up to many challenges and did a great job.

 

 

32 Apr-2 From: imnotajew456 To: paul26g

 

 

 

it is sad when anyone passes away and we need to care more about these people but, he was the Pope. To say he was not chosen by God is not true. In God's infinite plan for all things, he was destined by God before all time to lead his fellow towrds Christ and his contributions in this regard were tremendous.

 

Please Pray for our Pope.

 

33 Apr-2 From: fightgal2005 To: dthmtl3

 

Dear Jimhobbins

'abortion can be a wonderful thing"?!?!

that's warped. I've never known of anyone to celebrate having an abortion.

 

34 Apr-2 From: morashbob To: erh411706

 

 

 

To: erh411706

 

You might as well have said, "Let's get rid of anyone who might tell me what to do so that we can all live in chaos." And, what have you personally done for the poor lately?

 

35 Apr-2 From: morashbob To: Anne

 

 

 

1. Condoms, according to documented studies by the Centers for Desease Control, and several other prominent groups do not always prevent HIV transmission. Condoms may reduce the risk, but saying they prevent HIV transmission is giving people false security. I have had more than a few patients who tested positive for HIV state, "But I always used a condom."

 

2. The method of birth regulation taught by the Catholic Church is "NOT" the rhythm method. It is a method called Natural Family Planning. It is as effective as birth control pills. In addition, the divorce rate for those using Natural Family Planning is only 4%. Compare that to the rate in general which is greater than 50%. Natural Family Planning is easy to learn. It is taught to illiterate women in India. According to the British Journal of Medicine it is being just as effective as the use of condoms and birth control pills. And guess what? It does not cost these women anything.

 

3. Take a look at one of the methods by which birth control oills work. One of the methods is the chemical abortion of the products of conception. As the American College of Pediatricians states, "We become children at the moment of conception."

 

4. Take a long, true look at the homosexual community, (and not the one you see on TV shows). Then sit down and think about the good that comes from homosexual life style. I agree that no one chooses to be homosexual. Unfortunately, some people are born with a burden to bear. Although I'm not equating homosexuals to those attracted sexually to young children. However, I do not think they chose to have that type of sexual attraction either. It is a burden they have to carry.

 

5. I do agree a more noticable response should have come from the Vatican on the sexual abuse crisis. However, just because the media did not spend much time reporting on the Vatican response does not mean there was not a strong response. Sit down and do some reading. You might be surprised at how much has been done, and continues to be done. ... Sexual abuse accurs in just about all professions that deal with children. The question is, "Where is the pulic outcry against organizatons that have an even greater abise problem?"

 

6. By your post it might be time for you to go back to your faith.

 

 

36 Apr-2 From: rosemwest To: jimhobbins

 

Beautifully said. I thought the same thing about his timely passing so soon after Terri. But how appriopriate for such a loving human being. He shall be missed.

 

37 Apr-2 From: kramerdjr To: Anne

 

 

 

Pope John Paul II had a lot of compassion. I'm Jewish. He really helped to heal the old wounds between both religions. The Pope was truly a great man. We will miss him a lot.

 

David

 

-

 

38 Apr-2 From: rosemwest To: dthmtl3

 

Abortion can be a wonderful thing??? Then why has the woman whose abortion led to the Roe vs Wade decision changed her mind about it and is now marching Pro Life? Some people need to realize that abortion should NOT be used as birth control. An answer to over population? Ever hear of adoption?? What about all the people going to China to get babies for lack of adoptable babies here in the states? I have a dear friend who gave her baby up for adoption years ago. It was an extremely difficult but selfless decision. To give up a child for someone else to raise for the good of that child is a great sacrifice. It's a shame that so many women take the easy way out (at least at the time) and opt of abortion instead of life.

 

39 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: trestt

 

WHY IS IT IF IT IS NOT OF YOUR OPINION, IT BECOMES A PERSECUTION? HE SIMPLY DID HIS JOB HE TOUGHT US THAT THOUGH IT IS NOT AN APPROVED LIFE WE ARE NOT TO JUDGE, THAT WE MUST LOVE ALL PEOPLE. I DON'T LIKE THE STANDS OF BIRTH CONTROL, BUT I MUST RESPECT OTHER POINT OF VIEW. AS FAR AS STOPPING EVIL... HE HAD TO PRIORITIZE THERE ARE FAR WORSE EVILS IN THIS WORLD, HE WAS ONLY ONE MAN... IT IS UP TO US ALL

 

40 Apr-2 From: nicer45332 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

Just a note to say that I was raised a Protestant, first a Evangelical United Brethern, then and now a Methodist. I think that the Pope had a very positive attitude when dealing with people and that during his time, the whole Catholic Church seems to have opened up and have allowed the rest of the organized faiths to be a part of the religious world. He accomplished alot and he can now rest and be eternally happy with his accomplishments as Pope. he will be missed.

 

ktrich

 

41 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: Anne

 

FIRST OF ALL IT WOULD BE HYPOCRITICAL TO OK THE USE OF CONDOMS WHEN WE ARE TO WAIT UNTIL MARRIAGE, BIRTH CONTROL IS AN ISSUE I DON'TCARE MUCH FOR, HOWEVER I SEE WHY IT STANDS THIS WAY, THIS IS WHY WITH BC YOU ARE TRUSTING SIENCE, NOT GOD, AND IF CHILDREN ARE WORTH SO MUCH WHY DENY ONE (WHO KNOWSTHE CURER OF AIDS COULD HAVE BEEN ONE WHO WAS DENIED LIFE?) I ADMIT I DON'T LIKE THE THOUGHT OF 10 KIDS MYSELF BUT THE TEACHING MAKES SENSE

 

42 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: mrdl1230

 

SORRY BUT YOU ARE WRONG WE ARE NOT INFERIOR, JUST DIFFERANT WE HAVE A PLACE. WE ARE THE TEACHERS OF LIFE AND GOD. I USED TO BE ANGRY ABOUT IT UNTIL I REALIZED I AM MORE CAPABLE TEACHING THE YOUNG, AND I BELIEVE THAT IS MY PLACE I KNOW I AM NO LESS THAN A MAN A NUN IS JUST AS GREAT AS ANY PRIEST THEY REACH SO MANY MORE

 

43 Apr-2 From: xst0opidkittie To: paul26g

 

damn i agree.

 

44 Apr-2 From: Anne To: morashbob

 

 

 

Ok, so you believe all the garbage that was told you by the Church. Why don't you use common sense.

 

It is murderous for people to refuse to offer as much protection as is possible for those who can contract HIV, especially the poor in third world countries which do not have reliable health care for those with HIV.

 

How dare you, how dare you to suggest that someone not use the condom in these countries for at least some pretty good, if not perfect, protection.

 

And, too bad that you are a bigot about the need for gays (which I am not..I am a married woman) to have a love partner. You should hang you head in shame.

 

Your God appears not be a God of kindness and compassion, but one of bigotry and carelessness.

 

45 Apr-2 From: jonsmizzle11 To: ALL

 

IF THE POPE WAS NOT "SAVED" OR A BORN AGAIN BELIVER HE IS NOT IN HEAVEN. IF YOU BELIVE IN THE DEATH AND RAISEING OF CHRIST IN THE SAM E CHAPTER WHICH SPEAKS OF THIS IT TALKS OF THE VEIL IN THE TEMPLE BEING RIPPED MEANING MAN HAS A DIRECT CONNECTION WITH GOD. YOU DO NOT NEED TO TELL A MAN YOUR SINS YOU CAN TALK TO GOD. IF YOU DONT BELIVE THIS YOU CAN NOT BELIVE IN THE BIBLE BECAUSE IF ONE PART OF THE BIBLE IS WRONG THEN CHRIST DIED IN VAIN. YOU CAN NOT BELIVE ONE PART OF BIBLE AND NOT ANOHER THEN YOU CAUSE YOURSELF TURMOIL. TAKE HEAD TO THE WORD OF GOD. MNAKIND IS UNDER A NEW COVENT WHEN CHRIST DIED ALL THE FORMER PASTED AWAY. READ THE NEW TESTEMENT CONFESS YOUR SINS TO GOD NOT TO A MAN.

 

46 Apr-2 From: Anne To: kramerdjr

 

 

 

Will you miss his refusal to offer his support, but verbal and material, of condoms to the millions in third world countries who are contending with out of control AIDs?

 

Are you are of the tragic policy of this Pope to help the clergy in Central America and other countries to fight for the rights of the extremely poor, the desperate, via what they called Liberation Theology. (Do you know about the murdered Bishop Romero and the Pope's treatment of this champion of the poor?)

 

Maybe he was nice to the Jews, but he was not so nice to children abused by priests, or to gays who only wanted a normal love life.

 

His Cardinal Law, the one who sheltered and protected predatory priests, is now Bishop of a little church in Vatican City. He never had to answer to the Pope for what he did, transfering priests all over the place when they were found to have abused children.

 

 

47 Apr-2 From: Anne To: blushn80

 

No comment. What can I say.

 

48 Apr-2 From: telstar17 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

1. The bringing down of Communism without war.

2. The reconciliation between Jews and Catholics.

3. Praying with Muslims.

4. A call to all faiths to join together for the brotherhood of man.

5. His resolute position on traditional values.

6. Parodning his would be assain.

7. His long works hours up to his moment of death.

8. His dignity in dying saying that suffering before death is a blessing.

9. His breaking fear of AIDS by kissing an infected child.

10. His love for all mankind.

11. His value of life for all.

12. His not playing politics.

13. His comming out to be with people.

14. The job never went to his head.

 

I am going to miss him dearly......

 

49 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: dthmtl3

 

 

 

I BELIEVE YOU MEANT IDIOT. IF I AM AN IDIOT FOR PUTTING LIFE ABOVE ALL ELSE I LOVE LIVING IN IGNORANT BLISS.GOD DOESN'T MAKE MISTAKES. SPREADING YOUR LEGS GETS YOU PREGNANT. WAIT UNTIL YOU MARRIED HELPS!!! YES IT CAN BE DONE! POOR FAMILIES ARE THE CLOSEST. I KNOW I AM FROM ONE, THE OLDEST OF SIX (MY YOUNGEST SIBLING IS 8) I WOULDN'T TRADE ONE OF THEM FOR ANY BRAND NAME. HAVE YOU EVER SEEN AN ABORTION? DID YOU SEE THE BABY WRIGGLE IN PAIN? HAVE YOU HEARD OF BABIES THAT WERE ABORTED BUT BORN ALIVE? THE BURNS THEY SUFFERED WOMEN CAN BE SO SELFISH A CHILD IS A GIFT THAT FOR PEOPLE WHO CAN NOT HAVE THEIR OWN WOULD LOVE TO RECEIVE. THERE ARE 3 POSSIBLE REASONS TO HAVE AN ABORTION 1- RAPE 2- INCEST 3-LIFE OF THE MOTHER. BUT LESS THAN 2% OF ABORTIONS ARE DUE TO ANY OF THE 3 I WOULDN'T USE ONE THE 3 REASONS EITHER AND YES I HAVE BEEN IN THAT POSITION OVER POPULATION? HA FOR EVERY BIRTH THERE IS A DEATH IT'S A BALANCE THAT I WILL NOT QUESTION GOD

 

50 Apr-2 From: lindazehnder To: jimhobbins

 

 

 

 

 

I feel as though you read my mind. When Terri died I also thought, I bet she is waiting for Pope John Paul II to walk with her through the gates of Heaven. She sure is in good company.

 

51 Apr-2 From: princessjill29 To: ALL

 

 

 

I don't understand this. This forum is supposed to share memories and prayers for and about the Pope. Half of it seems everything but. It's sad. Jesus Christ preached peace and because of this, the Pope did, too. Why don't we do it now? Whatever you're religion or beliefs, just reflect on the life of JPII. I know everyone has their differences, some of them very strong, but let us be tolerant at this sensitive time for many. Isn't that what he would want? I never realized how much John Paul II has done for the Catholic Church and the entire world until I came into college and learned more about my faith and about the Pope. He was an extraordinary man, and I think we have a lot to look up to him for. He was just so amazing, forgiving, and so holy of a man. May you rest in peace, John Paul II.

 

-Jillian, 18

 

52 Apr-2 From: loren19574 To: thatshot427

 

thats not how u spell peace u frickin retard.

 

53 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: jonsmizzle11

 

FYI THE CATHOLIC CHURCH TEACHES YOU THIS AND MORE WE BELIEVE THAT JUST BELIEVING IS NOT ENOUGH, YOU MUST STRIVE TO BE LIKE HIM (NO NOT TRY TO BE HIM) WE MUST LEAD BY EXAMPLE WITCH I BELIEVE OUR POPE DID. HE COMMITTED HIS LIFE TO GOD AND TO CHRIST. I COMMEND YOU FOR YOUR STRONG BELIEFS, HOWEVER I DON'T BELIEVE THAT ANY CHRISTIAN WOULD SAY ANYONE WASN'T IN HEAVEN, WE AREN'T TO JUDGE.

 

54 Apr-2 From: carnage45c To: ALL

 

 

 

I am proud to say I am a Roman Catholic. Pope John Paul II was the only pope I known in my lifetime. And while I agreed with him and the church on certain issues, i disagreed on others. Does that mean I cared for him any less and will not mourn him? No.

 

He did a lot of great things for the world and unlike certain American presidents, he knew there were other ways to peace. He was the head of the Roman Catholic church and our voice for the last 28 years.

 

If you didn't follow him, that's your choice. But know that the world lost a great leader today. And there will probably never be another like him.

 

55 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: jonsmizzle11

 

 

 

OH AS FAR AS CONFESSION, IT IS IN THE BIBLE, I ADMIT I AM NOT SURE WHERE. BESIDES WHAT IS THE HARM ? IT IS GOOD FOR THE SOUL. I FEEL BETTER AFTER I CONFESS, I SAY THE PRAYER THAT I AM GIVEN AND FEEL SUCH A RELIEF. A PRIEST WILL DENY GIVING ABSOLUTION ONLY IF IT IS A SIN OF THE HOLY SPIRIT, ( WHICH ISN'T OFTEN.) IN THE CONFESIONAL THE PRAYER YOU SAY IS TO GOD NOT THE PRIEST, DESPITE WHAT YOU HEAR WE ONLY PRAY AND WORSHIP CHRIST, WE HONOR MARY AS WE DO OUR OWN MOTHERS AND WE ASK THE SAINTS FOR HELP AS WE DO WITH FAMILY THAT HAS PAST ON. WE CHRISTIANS ARE ALL FAMILY LIKE IT OR NOT

 

56 Apr-2 From: bruinmominwv45 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

Although I am Baptist, I relate & agree with many of the Popes views. But in my heart I can not understand why this man, a human being is being upheld as if he was God. While I agree that he was a servant of God & did wonderful things during his life on earth, I see so many people feeling things that I believe we should feel towards God & Jesus. I think of John The Baptist being admired by some but he would tell them he was only here to prepare the way for Jesus, the Son of God. So while I feel a sense of loss for a wonderful man...I feel that people need to be this devoted & faithful to God...not a human. No human being has the power to forgive our sins...only God can do that through Jesus Christ. I do not intend to take anything away from catholics at all, but I just feel that if we all worshiped, had this much faith, respect & dedication for, our Holy God & His Son, Jesus Christ, the world would be a much better place. I will say a prayer for the world, not the Pope, for he no longer needs prayers as he is now in the presense of God.

 

57 Apr-2 From: jaxguzonja To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

pope was a good men im a muslim and i still respect him he helped a lot of people , it dont matter if ur muslim christian catholic where all the same. and thats what he belived in to , rest in peace

 

58 Apr-2 From: caglecntrygirl To: Dayhawk Kim

 

I think Pope Paul II will be most remembered for his work and the impression he has made on the young people all over the world. He will also be most rmembered for his great sense of humor.

 

Pope Paul II visited us here in South Florida some time ago. When I went back to the area the next day, I felt a calmess in the whole area and there were flowers all over the place. I could still feel the presence of Paul Paul II.

 

In my opinion, Pope Paul II was the most loved and the most popular Pope of my life time. He will be missed. May he rest in peace.

 

59 Apr-2 From: wareswind To: life4teri

 

 

 

leader will follow the teachings of Jesus Christ and those represented by Pope John Paul II. We do not need a liberal, "progressive" pontiff who will shame God and the value of man and life.>>>>

 

As Christ was a "liberal", i'd say you have a problem.

 

60 12:02 AM From: kirschy4 To: ALL

 

it is very sad that the John Paul died for many reasons:

1. He has great polotical view, he wants life and peace.

2. He has inspired many, many people, including myself.

3. he has been the 3rd longest living pope and the first non-italian pope in almost 500 years.

 

John Paul deserved more time on this earth and deserves to live more than any of us.

 

B.Kirsch- 14

 

61 12:28 AM From: thinkso13 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

The pope is dead! Amen! Maybe the next one will be just a little bit interested in ridding his church of child molesting clergy. The dead one did nothing but condone such crimes by enabling the molestors to remain in the church and engaging in perhaps the biggest cover up of all time. I do not understand how anyone can call themself christian and remain a member of of the Catholic Church Of Child Abuse.

 

62 12:34 AM From: codifex To: brooklynbud69

 

brooklynbud69 said:

"I pray that the new Pontiff will be more tolerant and take us forward, NOT back. The Catholic Church needs to move into the 21st Century. The challenges that lie ahead are many, but a progressive Pope can guide the Church with compassion and tolerance."

 

Tolerant. Of what? Forward and not back to what? How is right defined differently in the 21st century than it would be in any other? What challenges lie ahead? Progressive? What kind of progress are you talking about? What kind of compassion or tolerance?

 

I am not Roman Catholic. But, I have very simple views on what catholics might call dogma.

 

Right and wrong defined:

Right is that which is not wrong. Wrong is that which is hurtful to one's self or others.

 

What does God want?

To be wanted. He is jealous and will not tolerate any images to be worshiped or "venerated" instead of him.

 

Salvation. What is it?

To be allowed to be in the presence of god or at least in the light near him and be able to hear his voice (our food).

 

How do you get salvation?

It is not earned but given. The price has already been paid. All you must do is accept it and want it. Count yourself blessed if god sheds some grace on you. No other experience in this world is quite like it.

 

Can works save you?

No. But, if you have the grace upon you it is natural to work for god.

 

Do you believe in the Bible?

No. I believe in god and I accept his gift of sacrifice - Jesus Christ. The bible is but a collection of the words of god and are but a morsel of the food to come directly from the mouth of god.

 

Gay and Lesbian issues.

The human body was designed for male to be with female. Yet, it is not for us to judge but god judges. Respect and love all people and in all things let god's compassion and grace shine from you.

 

Abortion.

Is an egg a human being? No only a potential human being. Is a sperm a human being? Once again only half. But, when they are united, they comprise a new human being albeit not completely formed yet. God is not willing that any should die or be lost.

So, what is the answer?

In ages past, people used to "pass their children throught the fire". They claimed that they were sending their children to god or Baal. In reality, they were throwing away their unwanted children like so much trash. Children are not trash. There are plenty of people the world over who would love to adopt a child. Give them the chance.

If you plant corn you get corn. If you plant wheat you get wheat. If you plant beans you get beans. If you plant children you get children - it's not rocket science. If you don't want children don't plant them.

Proof from a scientific point of view:

Is the fertilized egg a complete human DNA? Yes.

Is the fertilized egg alive? Yes. It is a living cell or collection of cells.

Is a fetus a human being? Yes. Albeit a small version still growing but with fingerprints, brain, beating heart, hair.

What is the difference between a fetus and a baby. I suppose a fetus is an unborn baby.

Does being unborn make it not human? No. Human it is but it is dependant upon the parent.

Why did the bible consider a baby not a baby until the child was a few days old? Because in those days, if a child didn't live the required few days the parents were to be spared much of the heartache of loss by not giving the baby a name. Things that have names are remembered more than things that do not have names. Also, infant mortality was high before modern medicine.

 

These are my views of reality. Call it dogma if you want. It doesn't all agree with the Vatican I or II or Trent. However, I'm just glad I don't have to stand before god knowing that I condoned something that hurt another human being in such a way as abortion. I don't need that on my conscience and I surely don't want to answer for it.

 

As for Pope John Paul II. He was a pope. Responsible for leading an organisation that spans the globe. He may not have been perfect - who is. I do think that he was a force for peace and a stabilizing one at that. He was a bridge builder. I should hope to be so beneficial to the people of this world. God rest his soul and may he have a good seat on the grass where he can hear the words directly from the mouth of god.

 

Final word: If you want god... god wants you. But, if you don't want god then god will reluctantly give you your wish.

Codifex Maximus

 

63 12:46 AM From: sumatoronto To: fightgal2005

 

will somone please tell the bible thumpers to shut up!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

64 12:47 AM From: gomicrosoft To: thatshot427

 

 

 

One of the greatest humanitarians of the century.POPE JOHN PAUL will be remembered by 100s of millions for his true love for all of humanity.In truth, JOHN PAUL will always live and be loved in the very heart of this world .He was respected by all,even the none belivers were awed by his presence.I as do many believe that the almighty GOD will welcome JOHN PAUL as sure as there is a heaven.

 

65 12:53 AM From: arwenmuc To: ALL

 

 

 

I just wanted to tell everyone about a wonderful story I heard about the John Paul II...

 

At Indy Christmas Conference for Campus Crusade For Christ, my friend Drew's dad took us out to dinner at this Italian restaurant...we ate in the room that was decorated with the religious stuff...and there was a representation of the pope's head in the middle of the table. That reminded Drew's dad of something....

 

Drew's dad, who works on staff with Campus Crusade has known a lot of different staff members in the organization.

 

On guy that he knew, whose family was originally from Poland really felt as if God were telling him to go to Poland and spread the gospel...to Poland...so he went.

 

While he was there, he got the attention of one of the Cardinals of Poland. He was sharing with him about what Campus Crusade does, about personal relationships with Jesus Christ....and the Cardinal got really excited. He opened Poland up to Campus Crusade, and really valued a personal relationship with Jesus Christ....

 

and that Cardinal became Pope John Paul II :)

 

66 12:53 AM From: life4teri To: wareswind

 

To: wareswind

"As Christ was a "liberal", i'd say you have a problem."

 

Christ was not a "liberal"...he did not and does not condone many of today's liberal views and neither shall or will the Catholic Church or next Pope. Christ was accepting of others and is forgiving of those who follow his teachings and accept him as their savior. The Bible teaches against any form of murder and homosexuality., among other current "liberal" views. I don't know what your definition of a liberal is, but if it includes any of those items or anything against what Christ taught, then I would not say Christ was a liberal.

 

67 1:06 AM From: cathee002 To: jimhobbins

 

I have a different slant on this man's death. He was simply a man....not a God. Of course, in out culture, we tend to select persons that we give extraordinary credit for words and titles. The world will mourn, and ignorant people will kneel, and pray, and light their frickin's candles for this man. My thought is that for too long, he controlled and held the attention of the ignorant Catholic membership.

 

68 1:11 AM From: ceolsabhail To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

Coming from an atheist, thats right I'm an ATHEIST I will be mounful that a man who led billions of people, and has been though hell has died. From one who has no belief in God I will say that the days before his death has shown humanity at its finest.

 

ps - Like I said, I'm an atheist, but most atheists are being annoying by saying he is just another human. Face it, to billions of people he is more than a human. Imagine your mother, or anyone you look up to, dying than you will know how Catholics are feeling. Because its a sad day in catholism.

So stop preaching, Atheists. for just one minute.

 

So Pope John Paul II, IF there is a God you are with him right now. If there isn't RIP.

 

Cheers.

 

69 1:13 AM From: morashbob To: Anne

 

 

 

Anne,

 

You ask how I dare not recommend condum use? ... Easy ... The country in Africa that has had the greatest success in reducing the number of AIDS victims is the country that has emphasized manogamy and not condoms. All other countries that have emphasized condom use have seen an increase in AIDS. ... I also base it on years of medical experience. I've seen too many "condom" users contract HIV. I came to the conclusion long ago that condoms were not the answer.

 

The God I refer to, and the God I follow is the God who speaks to us through Scripture. Take a look at Scripturual teaching. The God I follow is a God of love and compassion. His name is Christ Jesus. He knows what is best for us. But, if you believe in a different god, then I guess you can follow the teachings of your god.

 

I do not want to deny anyone the partnership they desire, but having practiced medicine for many years now, I have seen the devestating impact of homosexual relationships. Yes, I have seen some who have had happy results. But for the most part the outcome has been anything but a happy one. I will admit, this is a subjective perspective of mine, but it is what I have seen.

 

Even if you do not believe in the God of Christianity, I would recommend you take the time to read Pope John Paul II's "Theology of the Body." It is an eye opener, especially if you want to see how "men" can gain a true respect for the wonderful dignity and beauty of women. Every man I have spoken to who has read it has stated it has lead them to a renewed respect and love for their wives.

 

 

70 1:27 AM From: morashbob To: jonsmizzle11

 

 

 

jonsmizzle11,

 

Yes, read your Bible. In it, if you read it, you will see that Jesus Himself gave "men" the authority to forgive or retain sins (John 20:23). Have you ever wondered why Jesus gave this authority to men? Did Jesus think that only those at that time would need this gift delegated to His followers? If Jesus thought people would need that gift in ancient times, don't you think we also would need it? Have you ever wondered why the Bible tells us that the prayer of presbyters forgives sin (James 5:16)? Have you ever wondered why Jesus told men that whatever they bound or loosed on earth, so it is in heaven (Mt 18:18)?

 

So, as you stand there judging that Pope John Paul II, try to recall, "Judge not unless you be judged."

 

Please read the Bible a little more closely before pontificating.

 

71 1:35 AM From: morashbob To: arwenmuc

 

 

 

arwenmuc,

 

Wonderful story. Thanks. It definately sounds like what Pope John Paul II would say to sharing Christ with others.

 

72 1:37 AM From: stevepfaff111 To: brooklynbud69

 

 

 

I pray that the new Pontiff will be more tolerant and take us forward, NOT back. The Catholic Church needs to move into the 21st Century. The challenges that lie ahead are many, but a progressive Pope can guide the Church with compassion and tolerance.

 

I read your post, and, as a catholic, feel compelled to respond. No one ever said that adhering to the teachings of the bible was going to be easy. We are all children of God, but there is a big difference between believing in God, and being a good follwer. Pope John Paul was a moral compass for Catholics. In the eyes of the Catholic church, ALL human life is sacred. In the bible, sodomy is condemned, as are the seven deadly sins. Just because in todays' world, these temptations are more prevalent than ever, does not mean that the Catholic church must tolerate it. I agree with you, that the church has some antiquated beliefs, there is no doubt about that, but people need to stop acting on their own whims. I am not a bible thumper, but I get so tired of fellow catholics living a life of hypocrisy. IT IS NOT EASY TO BE A GOOD CATHOLIC. I don't claim to be a perfect catholic, but I do adhere to the teachings of the bible and church as much as I humanly can. I had considered leaving the church for reasons of perceived intollerance, but the older I get, & the more I read the bible, I realize that it's pretty cut and dry. All men are in God's grace, but how long you spend in purgatory is up to you.

 

If you want to talk about compassion, I'm sure you know that Pope John Paul II had many visits with the man that tried to kill him. He did not act quickly enough on the pedophilia issues that seem to be plaguing our church, but he did condemn it publicly to the archbishops. If you want to find the truly guilty parties on this, look no further than your local bishop. For this reason, I will never again tithe to the council of bishops. The acts, or lack thereof, perpetrated by them, in my eyes are unforgiveable. I pray for the repose of the soul of John Paul II, he was a great man

 

73 1:38 AM From: cathee002 To: thatshot427

 

This man did not impact my life....he made an appearance at the window of the Vatican every now and then and had ignorant people all over the world reacting to his presence.. Our world is so full of the ignorant.......next, they will be worshipping and kneeling before someone else, and Pope Paul will simply be as memory.

 

74 1:39 AM From: stevepfaff111 To: blushn80

 

AMEN, succinct and to the point

 

75 1:43 AM From: ceolsabhail To: cathee002

 

yes they will be worshiping someone else, this pope was one of 200 or so popes, but THE TIME IS NOW, and let the catholics worship the next pope when they are ready,

 

76 2:55 AM From: morashbob To: ALL

 

 

One of Pope John Paul II's greatest contributions: Read his writings on the "Theology of the Body." You will come away with a renewed veiw of the beauty of human sexuality and what sexuality is meant for. ... In a time when people are increasingly confused about sexuality, this man, who was never married, came along and offered a gift to those willing to take the time to accept it.

 

77 2:33 AM From: markbuor2 To: jimhobbins

 

 

 

Pope John-Paul II was an old right wing bastard who set progress back many years. The only reason that people like him is because he had a fun personality. But his ideas were backward and despicable. History will see him as blight on humanity. Unfortunately he was the one who appointed most of the present cardinals, and unfortunately those cardinals will probably chose a pope as bad, if not worse then PJII.

 

 

 

78 4:00 AM From: bluesboy16 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

I think the roman catholic church is a sham.

 

79 4:33 AM From: yor442004 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

The late vicar of Rome will be best remembered for his humility, for his intimate desire to reach out to all peoples of the world regardless of denomination, sect, creed, government, culture, ideology, race, sex, etc... His humility was so great that he bowed down to ask forgiveness for the Catholic Churches' mistakes and failures from the past, so unthinkable to do before he became Pope and yet so easy for him, so human yet divine, clearly an outstanding mark of his character, an act that made ordinary men equal with him and yet made him superiorly above the level of ordinary men.

 

We are sad for his demise but also happy that God has finally taken one of His exceptional sons for a mission he over-accomplished!

 

80 8:04 AM From: dabub242 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

I believe this pope tried harder than most to get the church into the 21st century but we should not let our momentary sadness mask over some very serious flaws. John Paul's reaction to the abuse crisis for the church was typical old school stonewall. He had a brilliant chance to finally set the church right and he did nothing. His appointment of Law to basilica was a grave error and so wrong for the thousands of abused. That is just the most apparent action that should be addressed.

When talking of peace, what peace in 27 years has he really affected? None. Did he do all he could do in Ireland? His token trips around the world were like hope missions of the powerless, feeding reality absolutly nothing.

You can not pretend he entered the political arena on a world scale and affected anything. You just need to look at Brazil, 90% catholic and what a shambles that country is, the lawlessness driven by third world poverty. How can the church continue to spend in the billions and let their so called flock stand in poverty?

The longer we treat the papal office as a traveling side show, a sacred cow wandering the streets of our cities, the longer it will remain just that. When we needed a Pope to step forward with the power of Christ's word and direct the church, he passed it over, and buried it like the rest of them. Then stepped to the window and waved to the throngs who deserve better!

 

81 8:51 AM From: lpnayve To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

Pope John Paul II is a model for all of us. He brought people closer to God. In a way, he was able to unite the people. He was able to touched the lives of many people not only Catholic but other religions as well. For me, he served God well by serving the people well...I will miss him very much...I just saw him on TV but his mere presence and sincere smile touched my life because I felt God's love through him...

 

I hope and pray that his successor will do the same or even surpass what Pope John Paul II has done for all of us.

 

 

82 9:26 AM From: osbr4242 To: thatshot427

 

He was a very very nice person . He help alot of people and God bless all of you in Jesus name . The Pope loved all of us ..........

 

83 9:37 AM From: Anne To: morashbob

 

 

 

Obviously, you have it all locked up and will continue to select data that suits your arguements.

 

Regardless of the lack of objective criteria.

 

No point in continuing this discussion.

 

84 9:43 AM From: Anne To: stevepfaff111

 

 

 

You don't hold the Pope, who never hesitated to criticize those he disagreed with, responsible for the atrocious behavior of his bishops? Do you know how much he coddled the infamous Cardinal Law?

 

He turned his back on the priests in Nicaragua who were trying to save the lives of those being murdered and made destitute. He advised the priests to work in concert with the corrupt and cruel government..I saw Frontline only last night which documents his failure to protect the poor in Nicaragua. He was good for the Polish, but he didn't help the former.

 

He was at heart a conservative. That's all.

 

85 9:44 AM From: Anne To: morashbob

 

Give me a break. Plenty of people have written eloquently about the meaning of sexuality, the beauty. He ain't the first by a long shot.

 

86 9:50 AM From: Anne To: dabub242

 

 

 

Finally someone here is telling it like it is/was.

 

You should see last night's "Frontline" re: the Pope.

 

He truly abandoned the desperately poor and the murdered human rights fighters in Nicaragua. Archbishop Romero had a meeting with him and left the Vatican in tears for having been treated with breathtaking,ignorant, ill informed rejection of his request for help (liberation theology).

 

87 9:56 AM From: hothingz4one To: jimhobbins

 

I think bush should be the new pope,

 

 

88 10:09 AM From: duyonfiyah To: Dayhawk Kim

 

his greatest accomplishment is when he visited hit would-be assassin and forgave for shooting him.

 

89 10:45 AM From: deadder5 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

Rock On Mr. Pope!

 

90 11:08 AM From: sh0pah0lic94 To: jimhobbins

 

 

 

I AM A BABTIST AND DON'T HAVE ANY TIES TO THE CATHOLIC CHURCH MYSELF, BUT I THINK HE WAS A GOOD AND FAITHFUL FOLLOWER OF CHRIST, I JUST CAN'T HELP BUT THINK OF MOTHER TERESA ALSO TODAY, LIKE THE POPE SHE DEDICATED HER WHOLE LIFE TO THE CHURCH AND THE PEOPLE, SHE DIDN'T SEEM TO GET MUCH MEDIA RECOGNITION , I BECAUSE OF THE DEATH OF PRINCESS DIANA. I DO BELIEVE THEY ARE BOTH IN HEAVEN TODAY WITH JESUS AND ARE IN PEACE. WE WILL MISS THEM BOTH

 

91 11:31 AM From: dman2391 To: Anne

 

To all those people who have used this forum to voice their irrelevant views regarding a religion they clearly don't understand. Get out. Leave this forum. I'm serious. You are blatently offending countless true believing Catholics. We are blind? We follow an archaic worldview? We hate and condemn a remarkable selection of minority groups? Fine, think what you like, God judges us all in the end, regardless of what you say. Read the title of this forum again. It's for memories and PRAYERS for the Pope. He was a bloody good man. He followed and enforced biblical law as best he could. A Law laid down by God, so it's not really to be entered into. If you don't believe it, then you're not Catholic. And that's fine, find or invent a religion of your own choosing. True Catholics believe in the Bible, and the teachings of the Pope, as a voice of God. John Paul was a clear and resounding voice, that helped many and, for we often forget, as a single man, performed powerful, heartwarming things that no other could do. Hell people complain about a president loosing sight of the picture after only a year or two, yet the Pope never did. If you hate him for his beliefs on sexuality, abortion etc, you're not a Catholic, because Catholics believe in the Bible, the word of God, and the Pope. If you're not a Catholic, this doesn't concern you. It's not a political forum. Please go somewhere else, and leave us our place to remember a man who brought to us so much happiness, and so much closer to God. John Paul II, no one is more deserving to be in God's presence, than you. Anus Dei, prequoles stecata mundi, misereare nobis.

 

92 12:08 PM From: solm8ts7 To: thatshot427

 

 

 

Thank You Dear Lord, for giving us such a wonderful man like our belovered Pope. I pray that all of us will take a part of him and try to live it to our fullist. He is going to make our world a better place to live. I pray with our Holy Father, that we will except people for what they are, and forget the color, or Religion that they our. Our Lord made( NOTHING BAD.) Thank you Pope John II for all you have done for this world. My the Lord hold all of us in the palm of his hands. May you rest in peace and watch over us.

James R Monaco

Tucson, AZ

 

 

93 12:10 PM From: Anne To: dman2391

 

 

 

As someone who was raised in the Church and educated in the Church for many years, I feel that it is necessary to protest the Polyanna-ish view of this Pope, as he had much influence and had the ability to do both harm and good.

 

Where do you suggest we post our protests? Somewhere where no one will notice? Oh, sure.

 

I never used the word "hate" re: the Pope. That's your word.

 

94 12:13 PM From: Anne To: hothingz4one

 

It's a hoot watching Bush speak about the death of the Pope. Do you recall his most awkward meeting with the Pope, who basically told him that the war in Iraq was wrong? He couldn't stand the Pope.

 

95 12:27 PM From: lindamallett To: Dayhawk Kim

 

I too, am an Episcopalian. As a Christian sister, I am saddened that such an important figure in the Roman Catholic faith has passed. I don't know a whole lot about Pope John Paul II, but I do know that he loved even his enemies. This is something we as Christians are taught from the day we can talk. He acted this out when he forgave the person that shot him. For the common person, this could instill hatred . The Pope so trusted in our Father that he was able to forgive. I know that he is now with God and he will rest in peace. My sympathies to all Roman Catholics and all Christians.

 

96 12:33 PM From: dman2391 To: Anne

 

 

 

But what good does turning his back on the entire history of his teachings for the whims of mortal men do? God had a clear vision, and if you believe in that God, then what right do we have to change that, to 'interpret' that. Pope's as styles and fads and even popular moral code come and go, but to the Christian, Gods word is forever. I mean, that's why we believe isn't it?

 

 

 

I don't ask you not to have your views, to you these views are very strong, more power to you. Just, I believe, as was the popes. What makes you more right than he that you may judge him so. And in such a position that he can make no retort.

 

 

 

I don't ask you to think different. I just ask that you find a better time and place for such things. Give Catholics even a day to relive the goodness of the Pope before you return to your vehement critique. It is your right, but please, some humanitarian decency for a deceased man, no more. To that end, how would you like it, if on the day of your funeral, men and women came to the please you were put the rest shouting your flaws and failures, trying to damage your legacy. Give him a day of peace, please. He's not as bad as you make him out. In my view, far from it.

 

97 12:53 PM From: wiggy1995 To: erh411706

 

Paul, I will pray for you. As the pope taught there is even hope for someone like you, may God bless you and your family .

 

98 1:14 PM From: asteriscoboricua To: ALL

 

 

 

I am glad he is gone. As a former follower-member of the Catholic Church but still an educated, urban, culturally- Catholic person, I firmly believe John Paul II is personally responsible for enhancing the lives of a few, but ending the lives of many. He unquestionably made some contributions that are worth-noting: he opposed the communist regime and forced changes in many countries behind the iron curtain, he probably travelled the most around the world as well as he probably had the most illuminated understanding of religious conflicts around the world and the need for unity and avoiding war. That said, he has been an obstacle in the natural intellectual evolution of one of the most influential institutions in modern society, the Catholic Church. There have been more people who have abandoned the church or simply stopped believing in it under his reign than potentially any other pope in modern history. By the adoption of his ideas, he failed many. He failed women, he failed gays, he failed every single poor and hungry child in developing countries who has been born to parents who cannot look after them and support them. Where is the Catholic Church and where is John Paul II when these children go unfed or when they die at age 2 because of untreated diseases or malnutrition?.

 

It would certainly be admirable for him to have saved their lives by preventing people from having abortions, but it is far more cruel to impact the birth of children who end up dying shortly after their birth. I would expect the pope to be a vehicle of religious guidance, but along with that guidance there has to be a social context. It is no longer enough to tell people not to have abortions, people need tangible solutions, people need to be educated about sex and pregnancy prevention. You cannot operate under the same assumptions for lay people as you do for the Clergy. Abstinence is a word not known to many and those who know what it means abstain from carrying out what it means!

 

In parallel to the spread of such anachronistic beliefs, the mission of the Catholic church secretly and passive-aggressively continues to be to propagate irresponsible births around the world as a means to have as many born-members as possible, thereby mitigating the inexorable exodus of its membership. This is no different to Islam and some other religions, but I expect more of an institution that has been founded on certain core beliefs that I have chosen to retain close to my values.

 

John XXIII took the church out of the dark ages and John Paul brought it back in. He single-handedly made decisions that did not follow the doctrine of Jesus. He did not love unconditionally, accept unconditionally and certainly behaved like a politician with more expensive vestments. As a pope he had a mandate too big for him to fulfill. He was appointed pope to guide the church followers, both socially an

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Accounts: Pope's Last Utterance 'Amen'

http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/news/story.jsp...500.htm&sc=1103

 

 

By MARIA SANMINIATELLI

VATICAN CITY (AP) - Just before he died, Pope John Paul II stared from his bed at the window of his airy, sparsely furnished Vatican bedroom, looking toward the crowd gathered below in St. Peter's Square and whispered ``Amen,'' according to accounts of the pontiff's last moments.

 

While the Vatican has not confirmed either story or given its own version of John Paul's final words, two accounts claim the pope's last utterance was ``Amen,'' the traditional close of a prayer. Amen is Hebrew for ``may it be so.'' It was not clear, however, if the story originated from more than one source.

 

The Rev. David O'Connell, president of Catholic University in Washington, D.C., told CNN on Sunday that a cardinal, a friend whom he did not identify by name, recounted that just before the pope died at 9:37 p.m. Saturday he grasped the hand of his long-serving private secretary, Archbishop Stanislaw Dziwisz.

 

``And looking out the window, the curtains were not drawn, he was looking out the window. And he said, 'Amen.' And then he passed on - beautiful, touching communication, a sense that it was finished, it was over,'' O'Connell said.

 

The Italian newspaper La Repubblica quoted the Rev. Jarek Cielecki, a Polish priest, as saying that the 84-year-old pope raised his right hand as if to offer a blessing to those reciting the rosary in the square.

 

``Once the faithfuls' prayer ended the pope made a huge effort and pronounced the word 'Amen,''' he said. ``An instant later he died.''

 

The newspaper did not say how Cielecki learned those details.

 

The Holy See said in a statement that the Vatican celebrated a Mass for John Paul and he received the sacrament for the sick and dying for the second time this week in the 97 minutes before he died on Saturday.

 

The Vatican said a Mass for the Feast of Divine Mercy was celebrated beginning at 8 p.m. and was officiated over by Dziwisz, Ukrainian Cardinal Marian Jaworski and two Polish prelates.

 

The sacrament for the sick and dying, formerly known as last rites, was administered, along with Viaticum, or communion received when death appears imminent.

 

The Rev. Pawel Ptasznik, the chief of the Polish section at the Vatican, visited John Paul and left shortly before noon with tears in his eyes, Milan daily Corriere della Sera reported.

 

``I kneeled, Don Stanislaw (Dziwisz) told him who I was, he opened his eyes, he looked at me and made a sign of the cross on my forehead with the thumb of his right hand,'' Ptasznik told the newspaper.

 

In his last hours, the pontiff lay in bed in a tangle of medical tubes and probes. Dziwisz did not leave his side and held the pope's hand, which he occasionally caressed slowly. Around them, tearful Polish nuns recited the rosary, La Repubblica reported.

 

Present at the moment of death were his two secretaries, Dziwisz and Monsignor Mieczyslaw Mokrzycki, Cardinal Marian Jaworski, Archbishop Stanislaw Rylko, the Rev. Tadeusz Styczen, three nuns who assist the pope and their superior, Sister Tobiana Sobodka.

 

The pope's personal physician, Dr. Renato Buzzonetti, with the two doctors on call, Dr. Alessandro Barelli and Dr. Ciro D'Allol, and two nurses on call, also were with the pontiff as he died.

 

The Vatican said the pope's final hours were marked by the ``uninterrupted prayer of all those who were assisting him in his pious death and by the choral participation in prayer of the thousands of faithful who for many hours had been gathered in St. Peter's Square.''

 

 

04/03/05 21:12

 

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John Paul II pondered his fate in 2000

Vatican releases details of pontiff's will

 

Thursday, April 7, 2005 Posted: 2:02 PM EDT (1802 GMT)

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/04/07...main/index.html

 

 

VATICAN CITY (CNN) -- In 2000, Pope John Paul II pondered whether the new millennium would mark the end of his pontificate and considered having his funeral in his Polish homeland, according to his spiritual testament, which the Vatican published Thursday.

 

Ultimately, he left the decision of his burial in the hands of the College of Cardinals, although the pope was clear that it should take place "in the bare earth," not in a tomb.

 

Cardinals decided to bury John Paul, whose funeral is set for Friday, in a grotto beneath St. Peter's Basilica.

 

The pontiff wrote his 15-page testament in Polish, beginning in 1979, the year after he became pope. The pope had said that he reviewed it each Lenten season. (Text of will)

 

The pope died Saturday, and his body has lain in state since Monday in the basilica, where hundreds of thousands of pilgrims and dozens of world leaders have come to pay their final respects.

 

Some of the public waited longer than 12 hours for their chance to see the pope's body for a few seconds.

 

Police froze the line to enter the basilica Wednesday evening but reopened it Thursday morning. The line was closed for good later Thursday.

 

After the end of public viewing, there will be time for dignitaries to view the body and for preparation of the basilica for the funeral.

 

President Bush; his wife, Laura; former Presidents George H.W. Bush and Clinton; and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice led a U.S. delegation to the Vatican on Wednesday. Andrew Card, the president's chief of staff, accompanied them. They viewed the body late Wednesday.

 

The College of Cardinals has been meeting daily to plan the funeral and a conclave that will choose John Paul II's successor.

 

The conclave is set to begin April 18, and 117 cardinals -- all under 80 -- are eligible to attend.

 

The Vatican released copies of the will in its original Polish and in an Italian translation Thursday.

 

The pope's first entry, on March 6, 1979, noted that he left no material possessions behind, requesting that his personal secretary, Stanislaw Dziwisz, distribute "those items of daily use ... as may appear opportune" and ensure that his personal notes are burned.

 

But the most extensive entries came in March 2000, when the pontiff, then nearly 80, was suffering from Parkinson's disease and other ailments.

 

He began an entry recalling the words fellow Polish Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski said to him when he first became pope: "The duty of the new pope will be to introduce the church into the third millennium."

 

John Paul wrote, "Day by day the 20th century closes behind us and the 21st century opens."

 

With the old millennium "retreating into the past," he asked if it might not be time to follow the path of the biblical story of Simeon. Simeon was told he would not die before seeing the Messiah, according to the New Testament's Gospel of Luke.

 

"Lord, now let your servant go in peace, your word has been fulfilled," Simeon said when Mary and Joseph brought their son Jesus into the temple.

Security challenges

 

The crowds have presented security challenges for the Italian authorities, especially with the 200 world leaders who are expected to attend the funeral.

 

Metal detectors were being installed in St. Peter's Square, and security forces were slated to swell to 15,000, including 1,500 military forces, by Friday, an official said.

 

Rome Mayor Walter Veltroni said all nonessential traffic will be halted in the city from midnight (6 p.m. ET) Thursday until 6 p.m. (noon ET) Friday, and schools and other public buildings will be closed between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.

 

Airspace within 40 miles of the Vatican will be off-limits to private aircraft. Security cameras already are monitoring key areas, and the Tiber River is under patrol. (Full story)

 

With the city's hotels full -- and the ancient Circus Maximus an impromptu campground for thousands -- Veltroni issued "an informal invitation" for residents to house pilgrims arriving for the funeral.

 

 

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Text of pope's last will and testament

 

Thursday, April 7, 2005 Posted: 1:08 PM EDT (1708 GMT)

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/04/07...l.ap/index.html

 

 

VATICAN CITY (AP) -- The following is an English translation of the official Vatican Italian translation of the text of Pope John Paul II's last will and testament, which was originally written in Polish, dated June 3, 1979, with successive additions:

 

The testament of 6.3.1979

 

Totus Tuus ego sum (Latin for "I am completely in Your hands")

 

In the Name of the Holiest Trinity. Amen.

 

"Keep watch, because you do not know which day when the Lord will come" (Matthew 4, 42) -- These words remind me of the final call, which will come the moment that the Lord will choose. I desire to follow Him and desire that all that is part of my earthly life shall prepare me for this moment. I do not know when it will come, but, like all else, this moment too I place into the hands of the Mother of My Master: Totus Tuus. In the same maternal hands I place All those with whom my life and vocation are bound. Into these Hands I leave above all the Church, and also my Nation and all humanity. I thank everyone. To everyone I ask forgiveness. I also ask prayers, so that the Mercy of God will loom greater than my weakness and unworthiness.

 

During spiritual exercises I reflected upon the testament of the Holy Father Paul VI. This study has led me to write the present testament.

 

I leave behind me some property which necessitates disposal. Regarding those items of daily use of which I made use, I ask that they be distributed as may appear opportune. My personal notes are to be burned. I ask that Don Stanislaw (his personal secretary, Archbishop Stanislaw Dziwisz) oversees this and thank him for the collaboration and help so prolonged over the years and so comprehensive. All other thanks, instead, I leave in my heart before God Himself, because it is difficult to express them.

 

Regarding the funeral, I repeat the same disposition given by the Holy Father Paul VI. (Notes in margin): Burial in the bare earth, not in a tomb, 13.3.92 (March 13, 1992).

 

Totus Tuus ego sum

 

5.III.1982 (March 5, 1982)

 

In the course of the spiritual exercises this year I have read (several times) the text of the testament of 6.III.1979. (March 6, 1979). Notwithstanding that even now it is to be considered as provisional (not definitive), I leave it in its presently existing form. I change (for now) nothing, nor do I add anything, as regards the arrangements contained within it.

 

The attempt on my life of 13.V.1981 (May 13, 1981) has in some way confirmed the exactness of the words written in the period of the spiritual exercises of 1980 (24.II - 1.III) (Feb. 24-March 1).

 

All the more profoundly I feel myself totally in the Hands of God -- and I remain continually at the disposition of my Lord, entrusting myself to Him and to His Immaculate Mother (Totus Tuus).

 

John Paul pp. II

 

5.III.1982 (March 5, 1982)

 

In connection with the final phrase of my testament of 6.III.1979 (March 6, 1979) ("About the place/the place, that is, of the funeral/may the College of Cardinals and Compatriots") -- I clarify what I had in mind: the metropolitan of Krakow or the General Council of the Bishops of Poland -- I ask in the meantime the College of Cardinals to satisfy to the extent possible the eventual questions of the aforementioned.

 

1.III.1985 (March 1, 1985) (during spiritual exercises).

 

Again -- concerning the expression "College of Cardinals and the Compatriots": the "College of Cardinals" has no obligation to consult "the Compatriots" on this question; it can, in any case, do so, if for some reason it considers it right to do so.

 

JPII

 

The spiritual exercises of the Jubilee year 2000

 

(12-18.III) (March 12-18)

 

(VATICAN'S NOTATION: "for the will")

 

1. When, on the day of Oct. 16, 1978, the conclave of cardinals chose John Paul II, the Primate of Poland Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski told me: "The task of the new pope will be to introduce the Church into the Third Millennium." I do not know if I am repeating the phrase exactly, but at least such was the sense of what I heard then. It was said by the Man who has passed into history as the Primate of the Millennium. A great Primate. I was witness to the mission, to His total entrusting of himself. To His struggles; to His victory. "Victory, when it will come, will be a victory through Maria" -- these, the words of his Predecessor, Cardinal August Hlond, the Primate of the Millennium was wont to repeat.

 

In this way I was to some degree prepared for the task which was placed before me on Oct. 16, 1978. As I write these words, the Jubilee Year of 2000 is already a reality, and under way. The night of Dec. 24, 1999, the symbolic Door of the Great Jubilee of the Basilica of St. Peter was opened, and successively that of St. John Lateran, then St. Mary Major's on New Year's Eve; and on Jan. 19, the Door of the Basilica of St. Paul "Outside the Walls." This latter event, given its ecumenical character, has remained particularly engraved in memory.

 

2. To the degree that the Jubilee Year 2000 goes forward, closing behind us day by day is the 20th century, while the 21st century opens. In accordance with the designs of Providence, it was granted to me to live during the difficult century that is passing, and now, in the year during which my age reaches 80 years ("octogesima adveniens"), it is necessary to ask if it is not the time to repeat the words of the Biblical Simeon, "Nunc dimittis." ("Now Master you may let your servant go.")

 

On May 13, 1981, the day of the attempt upon the life of the Pope during the general audience in St. Peter's Square, Divine Providence saved me from death in a miraculous way. He who is the sole Savior of life and of death, Himself prolonged this life, and in a certain way gave it to me anew. From this moment it belongs to Him all the more. I hope that He will help me to recognize the time until when I must continue this service, to which he called me on the day of Oct. 16, 1978. I ask (Him) to call me when He wants. "In life and in death we belong to the Lord ... we are of the Lord" (cf Romans 14, 8). I hope too that throughout the time given me to carry out the service of Peter in the Church, the Mercy of God will lend me the necessary strength for this service.

 

More to come

 

-----------------------------------------------------

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WOW WOW WOW All the messages!!!

 

I will try to post all 381 of them here.

 

http://community.netscape.com/n/pfx/forum....ag=ws-newsforum

 

 

NewsForum

World Faiths: Thread #193990

 

Pope John Paul II Modernized the Chur...

 

1 Apr-2 From: Dayhawk Kim To: ALL

 

 

 

Pope John Paul II Modernized the Church

 

As the third longest-serving pontiff in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, Pope John Paul II's place in history has been assured, not only for having brought more changes to the billion-member church than anyone in modern history. For what do you believe he is most likely to be remembered?

 

In his final hours, Pope John Paul II asked to remain in the Vatican, instead of being taken to a hospital, as he suffered from multiple organ failures and drifted in and out of consciousness. He battled the effects of Parkinson's disease and in many ways conquered it, touching the lives of so many millions at the risk of his own.

 

Elected in 1978 following the sudden death of John Paul I, who held that office for only a month, Karol Wojtyla was born in Poland in 1920, as the world emerged from its first global conflict. As his nation was plunged into World War II, the young man distinguished himself as a partisan, helping to protect his countrymen from the Nazi hordes who were plundering Europe.

 

Ordained a priest on November 1st, 1946, Father Karol immediately found himself immersed in a new battle to save Poland -- and much of the world -- from the menace of Communism. Many of those who had been victorious in fighting fascism now found their countries menaced by a new threat, that of godless Communism.

 

Spreading from Soviet Russia outward in every direction, Communism rapidly engulfed Father Karol's native Poland and much of Europe and Asia during the 1950's. Communism was still a threat both to churches and the faithful throughout the world at the time of the election and sudden death of John Paul I in 1971.

 

Defying predictions, papal electors named Karol Wojtyla to succeed to the papacy, becoming not only the first Polish-born pontiff, but also the first from a non-Italian state in more than five centuries.

 

Among his many achievements, one of the most memorable will be his more than one hundred trips outside Italy and the Vatican, cementing relationships with Catholics and non-Catholics alike around the world.

 

He also determined to make the Church more accessible, not only expanding the use of modern languages in bringing Christ's gospel to the world at large, but also in reaching out to new audiences, and particularly the young.

 

The pontiff took unprecedented initiatives to bridge the major faiths and seal the schism between the ancient and modern Catholic branches. He visited a synagogue, a mosque and the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

 

At interfaith gatherings he proudly displayed the banner of the power of faith and unity against war, terrorism and injustice. He demonstrated the power of prayer and personal faith by reforming the praying of the rosary and canonizing a record-number of lay people during his reign. He also named almost all the cardinals who will elect his successor.

 

His reign might have been cut short by an assassin's bullet in 1981, but the new Pope, who had chosen to commemorate his predecessor's tragically brief service by taking the name John Paul II, not only survived the bullet wound, he lived to visit his would-be assassin in jail.

 

While embracing many changes to help bring Catholicism into the 21st century, Pope John Paul II has steadfastly refused to yield on matters which he has declared articles of faith. That has disappointed some parishioners, including many women, for whom the pontiff has described a special role in the Church -- but not one including ordination as clergy.

 

Similarly, he has disappointed or even angered some of those seeking other changes in doctrine, including advocates for gay and lesbian causes.

 

This pope has also had to contend with one of the more vexing challenges to face the church, that of the abuse by a few disturbed clergy of children under their care. That scandal has cost the church mightily, both in financial terms and also in the confidence of many of the faithful. One of the great challenges which Pope John Paul II has faced in his declining years has been how precisely to deal with the scandal which threatened to engulf parts of the church in a moral and legal quagmire.

 

Future generations will, each in their turn, ascribe credit or fix blame for the monumental events which have surrounded the church during John Paul II's papacy, but surely among the most memorable for future generations will be the triumphant return of Karol Wojtyla to the nation of his birth, freed from the dictator's yoke and able to worship God freely and without fear for the first time in many decades.

 

What, in your view, will likely be most remembered by future generations about Pope John Paul II?

 

[Views expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect those of CompuServe, the Forum or any government, agency or news organization.]

 

2 Apr-2 From: thatshot427 To: ALL

 

 

 

I didnt really know the pope but it is really sad that he died casue all he wanted for the world is peace!! He was very old and was lucky that he could live that long to help our world! He went all over the world again to help with the peace issue!! So i say to the pope " May your soul rest in peice"

 

And may you rest in our hearts forever!

 

 

 

3 Apr-2 From: jimhobbins To: Dayhawk Kim

 

As an Episcopalian I have no direct ties to the Roman Catholic faith but as a Christian I am struck by the many times I have come down on the same side of many moral issues he addressed (abortion, homosexuality and the state use of the death penalty amid the most prominent).

 

The death of any person diminishes all of us and especially with a man of his strength and character. But I found it interesting to reflect on a vision I had of a young lady approaching Heaven's portals and, pointing behind her saying, "Look, I come to prepare the way", as Karol followed close behind. The Heavenly Gatekeeper nodding and saying, "Thank you Terri".

 

Jim

 

4 Apr-2 From: shrimo9 To: thatshot427

 

I agree the Pope did wonderful things in an unsure world I admire him alot.

 

5 Apr-2 From: paul26g To: ALL

 

It is always a sad day when anyone passes away. But I have to wonder why all the fuss over this one man when so many others pass every day?? Why do we not act this way when we hear of someone elses death?? After all, he was not choosen by God. He was just a man who was picked by other men to be the head of an organization.

 

6 Apr-2 From: life4teri To: thatshot427

 

It is a sad day to know our wonderful and gracious, spiritual and moral leader has died, but his legacy will live on through his followers and the Catholic church. I pray that his successor is as great as him in accomplishing the many things Pope John Paul II did and is also as dedicated to teaching from the Bible the many moral and spiritual teachings of Christ and his apostles. I hope we as christians can grow stronger in our faith and help lead others to Christ as Pope John Paul II dedicated his life to doing. May he rest peacefully with our Lord and the Angels and Saints he will become.

 

7 Apr-2 From: carali625 To: thatshot427

 

 

 

i am very sad of pope john paul the second has died. he was a great leader to me I ook up to him as a leader. he was one with god. its sad all he went through in life. your in my heart forever.

 

 

 

 

 

Michelle machado 11 years old

 

8 Apr-2 From: samily4u To: ALL

 

The world will miss one of the greatest popes that represented all people of the world. God rest his soul

 

9 Apr-2 From: brooklynbud69 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

John Paul's greatest achievement was taking the Catholic Church back to Vatican I. The reforms of Vatican II were completely obliterated. No, I will not mourn this man. He turned his head while thousands of priests were molesting young children and chastised thousands of followers because they did not meet with his neo-conservative views.

 

I pray that the new Pontiff will be more tolerant and take us forward, NOT back. The Catholic Church needs to move into the 21st Century. The challenges that lie ahead are many, but a progressive Pope can guide the Church with compassion and tolerance.

 

10 Apr-2 From: jjdouylliez To: thatshot427

 

 

 

Pope John Paul II was a great man and his loss will be felt by not only the Catholic Church but every church claiming to be Christian. Protestant Churches are not a part of the Catholic Church but we all have Catholic roots and we are all Christians believing in One triune God. He is the sole Head of the Church and his wisdom and guidance of the Church will be sorely missed.

 

Jacob Douylliez 15 years old

 

11 Apr-2 From: life4teri To: brooklynbud69

 

I pray our next spiritual and moral leader will follow the teachings of Jesus Christ and those represented by Pope John Paul II. We do not need a liberal, "progressive" pontiff who will shame God and the value of man and life.

 

12 Apr-2 From: sexibeez17 To: ALL

 

he was a good person and he will never be forgotten

 

13 Apr-2 From: bednarfp To: ALL

 

 

 

I was in Krakow, Poland, in August of 1987, and could see the great love that the Polish people had for Pope John Paul II, and the great appreciation that they had for both the Pope and our President Reagan's efforts to try to free Eastern Europe from the iron hand of the Soviet Union. They did become free two years later. I believe that event will hallmark his greatest accomplishment, and also for being a great communicator who traveled around the world to spread good will.

 

Pope John Paul II was truly gifted and blessed. He now belongs to the ages and will be remembered as the great Pope.

 

Fred

 

.

 

14 Apr-2 From: erh411706 To: paul26g

 

Now another group of red hats can elect a different man to sit in the isolation of Vatican City and try to have everyone adhere to his utterances. None of them know what goes on in the real world.

 

I say abolish the whole beurocracy and give the money back to the poor from whom it was stolen in the first place.

 

15 Apr-2 From: waving2uhello To: erh411706

 

 

Finally the Pope went to the old Pope's home. Amen

 

16 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: paul26g

 

 

 

WE MOURN BECAUSE HE WAS OUR LEADER LIVED BY EXAMPLE. HIS LIFE WAS TRUELY AMAZING EVEN WHEN HE WAS A BOY GROWING UP IN POLAND. IT IS A LOSS THAT MIRRORS THE PASSING OF A FAMILY MATRIARCH. MORE THAN THE HOLLYWOOD STARS MANY MOURN TODAY. AS TO HIM BEING CHOSEN BY MEN, THIS IS TRUE, HOWEVER THESE WERE MEN INSPIRED BY GOD JUST AS THE BIBLE ITSELF WAS WRITTEN BY MEN INSPIRED BY GOD.

 

17 Apr-2 From: trestt To: ALL

 

Only God knows his failures and he will be judged for all the evil he could have stopped but he chose not to. Among those the persecution and picking of the gay and lesbian community.

 

I hope the next Pope takes a look at the world in the way it has changed for good and follow suit. Althought I don't see much change coming.

 

 

18 Apr-2 From: alienbyrrd To: ALL

 

I am neither a Catholic, nor a Christian, but the world has lost a great man. As much as I have disagreed with some of his positions, I have had no choice but to listen and think. I remember his election. I remember what happenned in his homeland. I am sure that Mother Theresa has welcomed him with open arms. May he be blessed and kept within the loving arms of his God and his Saviour. Donna nobles pacem.

 

19 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: brooklynbud69

 

TIMES AND IDEAS MAY CHANGE HOWEVER GOD DOES NOT!!! SO HIS CHURCH SHOULD NOT EITHER.

 

20 Apr-2 From: deburninator222 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

i think saint john paul was a great pope, im only 12 and i admire his passion to follow it jesues's foot steps. i think and i hope that others to think this but i think that he was a caring and faithfull man to the church and to everyone.

 

 

 

21 Apr-2 From: robusky5 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

our prayer for great leader christain faiter i our time

 

love ray/pat robusky

 

from tulsa,ok usa

 

email address is ray7938@cox.net and robusky5@aol.com

 

22 Apr-2 From: Anne To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

Speaking as someone whose parents, brothers and (self) attended Catholic schools and universities, I do admire the many things you write about in your introductory passage.

 

However, I have to say that it has been years since I hae practiced as a Catholic and I am amazed that so little has been said about the following:

 

In 26 years as Pope, where was the compassion for potential victims of AIDS world wide when it came to the use of the condom to protect one from the virus? This Pope condemned the use of condoms and this powerful Church could have saved many lives by advocating the use of condoms.

 

Same with other methods of birth control. Only astinence is allowed (the ridiculous "rhythm" method.) So much for realistic birth control for women who need to use it.

 

Where was the clear, continuous, outspoken outrage from Rome for the sexual abuse of children and others by priests and religious. Yes, the Pope spoke out, but not much else happened. This is a disgrace.

 

Where is the compassion for the needs of gay people to partner in dignity?

 

 

23 Apr-2 From: Albert S. To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

To me personally the most important thing about John Paul II is while he was extremely conservative about doctrine, etc.-even rolling back some of the changes instituted by Vatican II-, he broke from the past in attempting a reconciliation between the Catholic Church and non-Catholics, stressing that the latters' beliefs should be worthy of respect.

 

Albert S.

 

24 Apr-2 From: glasscitydude To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

I am 28 years old and while I was born during the ponitificate of Paul VI and was an infant during the very brief reign of John Paul I, the only pope I have ever known is John Paul II.

 

As life has taken its twists and turns I have fond myself to be not an active meber of the Church. But in my heart and in my mind I always had a great respect and loyalty to this special man.

 

I was adopted as an infant in 1977 after my Catholic biological mother surrendered me for adoption. Her choice allowed me to have two beautiful parents and a really great life. When I was 10 or so I came to understand abortion and adoption and the tough decisions that the Holy Father championed. It felt as though this little Polish man in Rome were an advocate for my right to exist. As though he were promoting an understanding that even if I was the product of an "unplanned" (by humans) pregnancy, I was still very planned and wanted by God.

 

I was out to eat when I saw on the television that he had passed away. In spite of myself, I began to quietly cry. JPII was a hero to me in promoting socail justice and rights of those not yet born. Even when the world was against his thinking and his ideas were not popular I knew that he stood for little guys like me. He was our advocate and our defender.

 

Thanks JPII. I hope that from where you are you can really begin to see the good that you have done. We miss you.

 

Joseph Nixon

 

25 Apr-2 From: mrdl1230 To: thatshot427

 

 

 

Oh yea, this pope was just so accepting. Unless youre a woman and you want to be a priest. Can't do that, because women are inferior of course.

 

Anachronistic a-hole.

 

26 From: ALL To: ALL

 

 

 

27 Apr-2 From: dariusjc220 To: paul26g

 

Paul, you must be one of the stupidest Americans ever, i swear, you really are

 

28 Apr-2 From: dariusjc220 To: waving2uhello

 

another stupid inbred American comment, grow up you moron !

 

29 Apr-2 From: laxerlou248 To: ALL

 

As a young Catholic, Pope John Paul II is the only pope I have known. Even though religion is a constant battle with other activities in a teenagers life, this Pope was like a rock star to my peers and I. In a way, he was the Jesus of the modern era, taking a bullet in the name of christ, just as Jesus took his life over two thousand years ago. We will always remember you and thank you to our dear pope, Lolek Wojtyla.

 

30 Apr-2 From: laxerlou248 To: mrdl1230

 

It doesn't sound like you would be, let's say, suitable to be a priest anyway, so stop being a hyprocrite and shut up. The least you could do is to thank such a great man who devoted his whole life to God. and yes, by the way, I too am a girl and totally accept the Catholic religion.

 

31 Apr-2 From: morashbob To: brooklynbud69

 

 

 

Try reading Scripture. You will find that although Christ brought a message of love to the world, He was quite conservative. The life He calls us to lead is not necessarily an easy one. The Church will maintain its stance on the traditional values taught to us by Christ and His Apostles. ... I thank the Lord that we had such a man as John Paul II to hold firm on what is right and moral. ... He was a simple man who stood up to many challenges and did a great job.

 

 

32 Apr-2 From: imnotajew456 To: paul26g

 

 

 

it is sad when anyone passes away and we need to care more about these people but, he was the Pope. To say he was not chosen by God is not true. In God's infinite plan for all things, he was destined by God before all time to lead his fellow towrds Christ and his contributions in this regard were tremendous.

 

Please Pray for our Pope.

 

33 Apr-2 From: fightgal2005 To: dthmtl3

 

Dear Jimhobbins

'abortion can be a wonderful thing"?!?!

that's warped. I've never known of anyone to celebrate having an abortion.

 

34 Apr-2 From: morashbob To: erh411706

 

 

 

To: erh411706

 

You might as well have said, "Let's get rid of anyone who might tell me what to do so that we can all live in chaos." And, what have you personally done for the poor lately?

 

35 Apr-2 From: morashbob To: Anne

 

 

 

1. Condoms, according to documented studies by the Centers for Desease Control, and several other prominent groups do not always prevent HIV transmission. Condoms may reduce the risk, but saying they prevent HIV transmission is giving people false security. I have had more than a few patients who tested positive for HIV state, "But I always used a condom."

 

2. The method of birth regulation taught by the Catholic Church is "NOT" the rhythm method. It is a method called Natural Family Planning. It is as effective as birth control pills. In addition, the divorce rate for those using Natural Family Planning is only 4%. Compare that to the rate in general which is greater than 50%. Natural Family Planning is easy to learn. It is taught to illiterate women in India. According to the British Journal of Medicine it is being just as effective as the use of condoms and birth control pills. And guess what? It does not cost these women anything.

 

3. Take a look at one of the methods by which birth control oills work. One of the methods is the chemical abortion of the products of conception. As the American College of Pediatricians states, "We become children at the moment of conception."

 

4. Take a long, true look at the homosexual community, (and not the one you see on TV shows). Then sit down and think about the good that comes from homosexual life style. I agree that no one chooses to be homosexual. Unfortunately, some people are born with a burden to bear. Although I'm not equating homosexuals to those attracted sexually to young children. However, I do not think they chose to have that type of sexual attraction either. It is a burden they have to carry.

 

5. I do agree a more noticable response should have come from the Vatican on the sexual abuse crisis. However, just because the media did not spend much time reporting on the Vatican response does not mean there was not a strong response. Sit down and do some reading. You might be surprised at how much has been done, and continues to be done. ... Sexual abuse accurs in just about all professions that deal with children. The question is, "Where is the pulic outcry against organizatons that have an even greater abise problem?"

 

6. By your post it might be time for you to go back to your faith.

 

 

36 Apr-2 From: rosemwest To: jimhobbins

 

Beautifully said. I thought the same thing about his timely passing so soon after Terri. But how appriopriate for such a loving human being. He shall be missed.

 

37 Apr-2 From: kramerdjr To: Anne

 

 

 

Pope John Paul II had a lot of compassion. I'm Jewish. He really helped to heal the old wounds between both religions. The Pope was truly a great man. We will miss him a lot.

 

David

 

-

 

38 Apr-2 From: rosemwest To: dthmtl3

 

Abortion can be a wonderful thing??? Then why has the woman whose abortion led to the Roe vs Wade decision changed her mind about it and is now marching Pro Life? Some people need to realize that abortion should NOT be used as birth control. An answer to over population? Ever hear of adoption?? What about all the people going to China to get babies for lack of adoptable babies here in the states? I have a dear friend who gave her baby up for adoption years ago. It was an extremely difficult but selfless decision. To give up a child for someone else to raise for the good of that child is a great sacrifice. It's a shame that so many women take the easy way out (at least at the time) and opt of abortion instead of life.

 

39 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: trestt

 

WHY IS IT IF IT IS NOT OF YOUR OPINION, IT BECOMES A PERSECUTION? HE SIMPLY DID HIS JOB HE TOUGHT US THAT THOUGH IT IS NOT AN APPROVED LIFE WE ARE NOT TO JUDGE, THAT WE MUST LOVE ALL PEOPLE. I DON'T LIKE THE STANDS OF BIRTH CONTROL, BUT I MUST RESPECT OTHER POINT OF VIEW. AS FAR AS STOPPING EVIL... HE HAD TO PRIORITIZE THERE ARE FAR WORSE EVILS IN THIS WORLD, HE WAS ONLY ONE MAN... IT IS UP TO US ALL

 

40 Apr-2 From: nicer45332 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

Just a note to say that I was raised a Protestant, first a Evangelical United Brethern, then and now a Methodist. I think that the Pope had a very positive attitude when dealing with people and that during his time, the whole Catholic Church seems to have opened up and have allowed the rest of the organized faiths to be a part of the religious world. He accomplished alot and he can now rest and be eternally happy with his accomplishments as Pope. he will be missed.

 

ktrich

 

41 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: Anne

 

FIRST OF ALL IT WOULD BE HYPOCRITICAL TO OK THE USE OF CONDOMS WHEN WE ARE TO WAIT UNTIL MARRIAGE, BIRTH CONTROL IS AN ISSUE I DON'TCARE MUCH FOR, HOWEVER I SEE WHY IT STANDS THIS WAY, THIS IS WHY WITH BC YOU ARE TRUSTING SIENCE, NOT GOD, AND IF CHILDREN ARE WORTH SO MUCH WHY DENY ONE (WHO KNOWSTHE CURER OF AIDS COULD HAVE BEEN ONE WHO WAS DENIED LIFE?) I ADMIT I DON'T LIKE THE THOUGHT OF 10 KIDS MYSELF BUT THE TEACHING MAKES SENSE

 

42 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: mrdl1230

 

SORRY BUT YOU ARE WRONG WE ARE NOT INFERIOR, JUST DIFFERANT WE HAVE A PLACE. WE ARE THE TEACHERS OF LIFE AND GOD. I USED TO BE ANGRY ABOUT IT UNTIL I REALIZED I AM MORE CAPABLE TEACHING THE YOUNG, AND I BELIEVE THAT IS MY PLACE I KNOW I AM NO LESS THAN A MAN A NUN IS JUST AS GREAT AS ANY PRIEST THEY REACH SO MANY MORE

 

43 Apr-2 From: xst0opidkittie To: paul26g

 

damn i agree.

 

44 Apr-2 From: Anne To: morashbob

 

 

 

Ok, so you believe all the garbage that was told you by the Church. Why don't you use common sense.

 

It is murderous for people to refuse to offer as much protection as is possible for those who can contract HIV, especially the poor in third world countries which do not have reliable health care for those with HIV.

 

How dare you, how dare you to suggest that someone not use the condom in these countries for at least some pretty good, if not perfect, protection.

 

And, too bad that you are a bigot about the need for gays (which I am not..I am a married woman) to have a love partner. You should hang you head in shame.

 

Your God appears not be a God of kindness and compassion, but one of bigotry and carelessness.

 

45 Apr-2 From: jonsmizzle11 To: ALL

 

IF THE POPE WAS NOT "SAVED" OR A BORN AGAIN BELIVER HE IS NOT IN HEAVEN. IF YOU BELIVE IN THE DEATH AND RAISEING OF CHRIST IN THE SAM E CHAPTER WHICH SPEAKS OF THIS IT TALKS OF THE VEIL IN THE TEMPLE BEING RIPPED MEANING MAN HAS A DIRECT CONNECTION WITH GOD. YOU DO NOT NEED TO TELL A MAN YOUR SINS YOU CAN TALK TO GOD. IF YOU DONT BELIVE THIS YOU CAN NOT BELIVE IN THE BIBLE BECAUSE IF ONE PART OF THE BIBLE IS WRONG THEN CHRIST DIED IN VAIN. YOU CAN NOT BELIVE ONE PART OF BIBLE AND NOT ANOHER THEN YOU CAUSE YOURSELF TURMOIL. TAKE HEAD TO THE WORD OF GOD. MNAKIND IS UNDER A NEW COVENT WHEN CHRIST DIED ALL THE FORMER PASTED AWAY. READ THE NEW TESTEMENT CONFESS YOUR SINS TO GOD NOT TO A MAN.

 

46 Apr-2 From: Anne To: kramerdjr

 

 

 

Will you miss his refusal to offer his support, but verbal and material, of condoms to the millions in third world countries who are contending with out of control AIDs?

 

Are you are of the tragic policy of this Pope to help the clergy in Central America and other countries to fight for the rights of the extremely poor, the desperate, via what they called Liberation Theology. (Do you know about the murdered Bishop Romero and the Pope's treatment of this champion of the poor?)

 

Maybe he was nice to the Jews, but he was not so nice to children abused by priests, or to gays who only wanted a normal love life.

 

His Cardinal Law, the one who sheltered and protected predatory priests, is now Bishop of a little church in Vatican City. He never had to answer to the Pope for what he did, transfering priests all over the place when they were found to have abused children.

 

 

47 Apr-2 From: Anne To: blushn80

 

No comment. What can I say.

 

48 Apr-2 From: telstar17 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

1. The bringing down of Communism without war.

2. The reconciliation between Jews and Catholics.

3. Praying with Muslims.

4. A call to all faiths to join together for the brotherhood of man.

5. His resolute position on traditional values.

6. Parodning his would be assain.

7. His long works hours up to his moment of death.

8. His dignity in dying saying that suffering before death is a blessing.

9. His breaking fear of AIDS by kissing an infected child.

10. His love for all mankind.

11. His value of life for all.

12. His not playing politics.

13. His comming out to be with people.

14. The job never went to his head.

 

I am going to miss him dearly......

 

49 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: dthmtl3

 

 

 

I BELIEVE YOU MEANT IDIOT. IF I AM AN IDIOT FOR PUTTING LIFE ABOVE ALL ELSE I LOVE LIVING IN IGNORANT BLISS.GOD DOESN'T MAKE MISTAKES. SPREADING YOUR LEGS GETS YOU PREGNANT. WAIT UNTIL YOU MARRIED HELPS!!! YES IT CAN BE DONE! POOR FAMILIES ARE THE CLOSEST. I KNOW I AM FROM ONE, THE OLDEST OF SIX (MY YOUNGEST SIBLING IS 8) I WOULDN'T TRADE ONE OF THEM FOR ANY BRAND NAME. HAVE YOU EVER SEEN AN ABORTION? DID YOU SEE THE BABY WRIGGLE IN PAIN? HAVE YOU HEARD OF BABIES THAT WERE ABORTED BUT BORN ALIVE? THE BURNS THEY SUFFERED WOMEN CAN BE SO SELFISH A CHILD IS A GIFT THAT FOR PEOPLE WHO CAN NOT HAVE THEIR OWN WOULD LOVE TO RECEIVE. THERE ARE 3 POSSIBLE REASONS TO HAVE AN ABORTION 1- RAPE 2- INCEST 3-LIFE OF THE MOTHER. BUT LESS THAN 2% OF ABORTIONS ARE DUE TO ANY OF THE 3 I WOULDN'T USE ONE THE 3 REASONS EITHER AND YES I HAVE BEEN IN THAT POSITION OVER POPULATION? HA FOR EVERY BIRTH THERE IS A DEATH IT'S A BALANCE THAT I WILL NOT QUESTION GOD

 

50 Apr-2 From: lindazehnder To: jimhobbins

 

 

 

 

 

I feel as though you read my mind. When Terri died I also thought, I bet she is waiting for Pope John Paul II to walk with her through the gates of Heaven. She sure is in good company.

 

51 Apr-2 From: princessjill29 To: ALL

 

 

 

I don't understand this. This forum is supposed to share memories and prayers for and about the Pope. Half of it seems everything but. It's sad. Jesus Christ preached peace and because of this, the Pope did, too. Why don't we do it now? Whatever you're religion or beliefs, just reflect on the life of JPII. I know everyone has their differences, some of them very strong, but let us be tolerant at this sensitive time for many. Isn't that what he would want? I never realized how much John Paul II has done for the Catholic Church and the entire world until I came into college and learned more about my faith and about the Pope. He was an extraordinary man, and I think we have a lot to look up to him for. He was just so amazing, forgiving, and so holy of a man. May you rest in peace, John Paul II.

 

-Jillian, 18

 

52 Apr-2 From: loren19574 To: thatshot427

 

thats not how u spell peace u frickin retard.

 

53 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: jonsmizzle11

 

FYI THE CATHOLIC CHURCH TEACHES YOU THIS AND MORE WE BELIEVE THAT JUST BELIEVING IS NOT ENOUGH, YOU MUST STRIVE TO BE LIKE HIM (NO NOT TRY TO BE HIM) WE MUST LEAD BY EXAMPLE WITCH I BELIEVE OUR POPE DID. HE COMMITTED HIS LIFE TO GOD AND TO CHRIST. I COMMEND YOU FOR YOUR STRONG BELIEFS, HOWEVER I DON'T BELIEVE THAT ANY CHRISTIAN WOULD SAY ANYONE WASN'T IN HEAVEN, WE AREN'T TO JUDGE.

 

54 Apr-2 From: carnage45c To: ALL

 

 

 

I am proud to say I am a Roman Catholic. Pope John Paul II was the only pope I known in my lifetime. And while I agreed with him and the church on certain issues, i disagreed on others. Does that mean I cared for him any less and will not mourn him? No.

 

He did a lot of great things for the world and unlike certain American presidents, he knew there were other ways to peace. He was the head of the Roman Catholic church and our voice for the last 28 years.

 

If you didn't follow him, that's your choice. But know that the world lost a great leader today. And there will probably never be another like him.

 

55 Apr-2 From: blushn80 To: jonsmizzle11

 

 

 

OH AS FAR AS CONFESSION, IT IS IN THE BIBLE, I ADMIT I AM NOT SURE WHERE. BESIDES WHAT IS THE HARM ? IT IS GOOD FOR THE SOUL. I FEEL BETTER AFTER I CONFESS, I SAY THE PRAYER THAT I AM GIVEN AND FEEL SUCH A RELIEF. A PRIEST WILL DENY GIVING ABSOLUTION ONLY IF IT IS A SIN OF THE HOLY SPIRIT, ( WHICH ISN'T OFTEN.) IN THE CONFESIONAL THE PRAYER YOU SAY IS TO GOD NOT THE PRIEST, DESPITE WHAT YOU HEAR WE ONLY PRAY AND WORSHIP CHRIST, WE HONOR MARY AS WE DO OUR OWN MOTHERS AND WE ASK THE SAINTS FOR HELP AS WE DO WITH FAMILY THAT HAS PAST ON. WE CHRISTIANS ARE ALL FAMILY LIKE IT OR NOT

 

56 Apr-2 From: bruinmominwv45 To: Dayhawk Kim

 

Although I am Baptist, I relate & agree with many of the Popes views. But in my heart I can not understand why this man, a human being is being upheld as if he was God. While I agree that he was a servant of God & did wonderful things during his life on earth, I see so many people feeling things that I believe we should feel towards God & Jesus. I think of John The Baptist being admired by some but he would tell them he was only here to prepare the way for Jesus, the Son of God. So while I feel a sense of loss for a wonderful man...I feel that people need to be this devoted & faithful to God...not a human. No human being has the power to forgive our sins...only God can do that through Jesus Christ. I do not intend to take anything away from catholics at all, but I just feel that if we all worshiped, had this much faith, respect & dedication for, our Holy God & His Son, Jesus Christ, the world would be a much better place. I will say a prayer for the world, not the Pope, for he no longer needs prayers as he is now in the presense of God.

 

57 Apr-2 From: jaxguzonja To: Dayhawk Kim

 

 

 

pope was a good men im a muslim and i still respect him he helped a lot of people , it dont matter if ur muslim christian catholic where all the same. and thats what he belived in to , rest in peace

 

58 Apr-2 From: caglecntrygirl To: Dayhawk Kim

 

I think Pope Paul II will be most remembered for his work and the impression he has made on the young people all over the world. He will also be most rmembered for his great sense of humor.

 

Pope Paul II visited us here in South Florida some time ago. When I went back to the area the next day, I felt a calmess in the whole area and there were flowers all over the place. I could still feel the presence of Paul Paul II.

 

In my opinion, Pope Paul II was the most loved and the most popular Pope of my life time. He will be missed. May he rest in peace.

 

59 Apr-2 From: wareswind To: life4teri

 

 

 

leader will follow the teachings of Jesus Christ and those represented by Pope John Paul II. We do not need a liberal, "progressive" pontiff who will shame God and the value of man and life.>>>>

 

As Christ was a "liberal", i'd say you have a problem.

 

60 Apr-3 From: kirschy4 To: ALL

 

it is very sad that the John Paul died for many reasons:

1. He has great polotical view, he wants life and peace.

2. He has inspired many, many people, including myself.

3. he has been the 3rd longest living pope and the first non-italian pope in almost 500 years.

 

John Paul deserved more time on this earth and deserves to live more than any of us.

 

B.Kirsch- 14

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